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Illinois Enacts Minimum Wage Hike To $15

Illinois is set to drastically change its minimum wage in the near future, reaching $15 per hour over the course of the next six years. Following passage by the legislature on February 14, 2019, newly elected Governor J.B. Pritzker quickly signed the amendments to the Illinois Minimum Wage Law into law. You should be prepared for the gradual increases (and other changes) to start taking effect on January 1, 2020.

llinois Set to Join $15 Minimum Wage Club

Illinois lawmakers have passed a bill that would raise the state minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2025 and significantly increase penalties for employers that violate the law.

Illinois Governor Signs Bill Raising the Statewide Minimum Wage to $15 Per Hour

On February 19, 2019, Governor JB Pritzker signed into law the “Lifting Up Illinois Working Families Act,” which raises the state’s minimum wage, in increments, to $15 per hour by 2025.1 With the enactment of this bill, Illinois has become the fifth state to pass a statewide increase in the minimum wage to $15 per hour, joining California, New Jersey,2 New York, and Massachusetts.3

Illinois’s Valentine’s Day Gift to Employees: A $15 Minimum Wage

On February 14, 2019, the Illinois legislature passed Senate Bill 0001 (SB0001), which amends the Illinois Minimum Wage Law and the Illinois Income Tax Act. Illinois’s minimum wage will increase from $8.25 per hour to $15.00 per hour over the next six years as follows:

Tackling Employee Expense Reimbursements Under New Illinois Law

Illinois employers are collecting receipts and preparing payments to comply with new legislation that requires employers to reimburse employees for business expenses incurred by the employee during the scope of employment. Specifically, employers are required to reimburse employees for all necessary expenditures and those expenses directly related to services performed for the employer. The Act defines “necessary expenditures” as all reasonable expenditures or losses required of the employee in the discharge of employment duties and that inure to the primary benefit of the employer.

Illinois Legislature Approves Bill to Raise Minimum Wage to $15.00, Sends to Governor for Signature

The Illinois legislature has now passed the “Lifting Up Illinois Working Families Act,” under which the state’s minimum wage will increase to $15.00 per hour over the next six years. Governor J.B. Pritzker has stated that he intends to sign the bill into law prior to his first budget speech on February 20th.

Illinois Supreme Court Ruling: Biometric Privacy Law Only Requires Violation, Not Actual Harm

On January 25, 2019, the Illinois State Supreme Court ruled that the state’s Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA) only requires individuals to show violation of the law to bring suit. Businesses with a presence in Illinois that gather “biometric identifiers”, which include a retina or iris scan, fingerprint, voiceprint, or scan of hand or face geometry, are now at a greater risk of liability if they do not follow legally required procedures for such data collected or stored in the state. BIPA’s applicability at the federal level remains to be seen, but similar laws are being considered throughout the states, raising potential liability for employers elsewhere.

Novel Biometrics Ruling Could Open Door to Lawsuits in Illinois

The Illinois Supreme Court has given the green light for consumers to sue companies for collecting biometric data, such as fingerprints, without telling them how the information will be used or first getting their written consent. While the ruling arises out of the consumer context, it has clear implications for employers.

Illinois Supreme Court Opens Floodgates for Biometric Lawsuits: Will the Business Community Lobby for Change?

The Illinois Supreme Court issued its long-awaited ruling in Rosenbach and reversed the appellate court’s decision that technical violations of the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (“BIPA” or “Act”) without “some actual injury or harm” are not actionable:

It's BAAA-aaack - Illinois Supreme Court Revives Biometric Data Claims

Back in 2008, Illinois enacted what at the time must have seemed like a relatively obscure law to address privacy concerns associated with biometric information – the Biometric Information Privacy Act or “BIPA”. At the time, biometric devices existed, but they weren’t terribly common. Today, many of us carry a sophisticated fingerprint reader or face scanner in our pockets, and many businesses have adopted biometric security for everything from company phones and computers to timekeeping systems to door access. Unfortunately, many of those same businesses had never heard of BIPA. Cue the lawyers.