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Major Headaches Coming for Chicago and Cook County Employers When Implementing Paid Sick Leave Ordinances

As most employers in the “Chicagoland” area are hopefully already aware, both Chicago and Cook County have enacted paid sick leave (PSL) ordinances that go into effect July 1, 2017.

Cook County Minimum Wage Regulations

Last month, the Cook County Commission on Human Rights issued final interpretive and procedural rules governing the Cook County Minimum Wage Ordinance, which becomes effective July 1, 2017.

Cook County, Illinois Publishes Final Rules for Sick Leave Ordinance: Employers, Are You Ready?

On July 1, 2017, the Cook County Earned Sick Leave Ordinance goes into effect. The Ordinance (at the time of this writing) provides certain employees in approximately 2/3 of the Cook County’s municipalities with paid sick time benefits.

Get Ready: An Update on the Cook County and Chicago Paid Sick Leave Laws

The Cook County Commission on Human Rights has issued its final regulations for the Cook County Earned Sick Leave Ordinance. The final regulations, which contain substantial changes from the draft regulations, can be found on the Cook County government website. The Cook County ordinance was passed on October 5, 2016, and will take effect on July 1, 2017. A model posting can likewise be found at the link above.

Draft Regulations on Cook County, Illinois, Paid Sick Leave Released

Draft regulations that will govern its interpretation and enforcement of the Cook County “Earned Sick Leave” Ordinance have been released by the Cook County Commission on Human Rights. The final regulations will be adopted by June 1, 2017, according to the Commission.

As July 1 Effective Date Approaches, Cook County Issues Draft Regulations for Paid Sick Leave

As we have previously reported, both Chicago and Cook County have passed paid sick leave laws that entitle covered employees to earn up to 40 hours of paid sick leave per year. Our previous alerts on these ordinances, which are linked here and here, provide background on the basic requirements of these ordinances.

Open for Comment: Cook County Commission on Human Rights Issues Draft Regulations on Earned Sick Leave Ordinance

On April 10, 2017, the Cook County Commission on Human Rights posted draft regulations for the Cook County Earned Sick Leave Ordinance. The Cook County ordinance was passed on October 5, 2016, and will take effect on July 1, 2017. The commission expects to adopt and publish final rules, a model posting, and required notices by June 1, 2017. The City of Chicago passed a virtually identical sick leave ordinance on June 22, 2016, and it too will take effect on July 1, 2017. To date, the City of Chicago has not published rules or regulations regarding the Chicago paid sick leave ordinance.

Illinois Garnishments News: Wage Assignments No Longer Expire in 84 Days

Recently, Illinois revised its wage assignment law. This development is important for multistate employers because Illinois is the only state with a statute that clearly and unequivocally provides that employers must honor contracts employees make with third parties to assign wages. Under the Illinois Wage Assignment Act, 740 ILCS §§170/.01 et seq., there are detailed steps that a creditor must take with an employee for an assignment to be legal and then again with the employer for the assignment to be enforceable against the employer. A highlight of three key changes to the law follows:

The Saga Continues: Recent Opt-Outs and Other Developments Relating to the Cook County Earned Sick Leave Act, Illinois Employee Sick Leave Act

The Village of Rosemont and the City of Oak Forest have become the latest suburban Cook County municipalities to join the Village of Barrington in opting out of the Cook County Earned Sick Leave Ordinance.

Federal Court Strikes Down Lincolnshire’s “Right to Work” Ordinance

Last week, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois held that the Village of Lincolnshire’s municipal ordinance regulating union activities was invalid under federal law. The ruling is a defeat for Governor Bruce Rauner in his efforts to work with local governments to pass municipal and county-wide right-to-work ordinances.