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Open for Comment: Cook County Commission on Human Rights Issues Draft Regulations on Earned Sick Leave Ordinance

On April 10, 2017, the Cook County Commission on Human Rights posted draft regulations for the Cook County Earned Sick Leave Ordinance. The Cook County ordinance was passed on October 5, 2016, and will take effect on July 1, 2017. The commission expects to adopt and publish final rules, a model posting, and required notices by June 1, 2017. The City of Chicago passed a virtually identical sick leave ordinance on June 22, 2016, and it too will take effect on July 1, 2017. To date, the City of Chicago has not published rules or regulations regarding the Chicago paid sick leave ordinance.

Illinois Garnishments News: Wage Assignments No Longer Expire in 84 Days

Recently, Illinois revised its wage assignment law. This development is important for multistate employers because Illinois is the only state with a statute that clearly and unequivocally provides that employers must honor contracts employees make with third parties to assign wages. Under the Illinois Wage Assignment Act, 740 ILCS §§170/.01 et seq., there are detailed steps that a creditor must take with an employee for an assignment to be legal and then again with the employer for the assignment to be enforceable against the employer. A highlight of three key changes to the law follows:

The Saga Continues: Recent Opt-Outs and Other Developments Relating to the Cook County Earned Sick Leave Act, Illinois Employee Sick Leave Act

The Village of Rosemont and the City of Oak Forest have become the latest suburban Cook County municipalities to join the Village of Barrington in opting out of the Cook County Earned Sick Leave Ordinance.

Federal Court Strikes Down Lincolnshire’s “Right to Work” Ordinance

Last week, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois held that the Village of Lincolnshire’s municipal ordinance regulating union activities was invalid under federal law. The ruling is a defeat for Governor Bruce Rauner in his efforts to work with local governments to pass municipal and county-wide right-to-work ordinances.

Gifts that Don’t Quite Fit in Your Stocking: New Employment Laws Taking Effect in 2017

A number of new state or local laws are set to take effect in Illinois in 2017 which will require employers to update their employee handbooks, employment agreements, and other policies and procedures. We address the key changes briefly here, and include links to our previous, more detailed analyses of the various laws within the text

Triple Threat: Three New Sick Leave Laws Take Effect in Illinois in 2017

Chicagoland employers are bracing for a recurring bout of compliance-related headaches as three new laws—the Chicago Paid Sick Leave Ordinance, the Cook County Earned Paid Sick Leave Ordinance and the Illinois Employee Sick Leave Act—go into effect in 2017. These laws create considerable uncertainty given the extent of their coverage, eligibility criteria and the various requirements they impose. Regardless of whether or not an employer operates in Chicago, Cook County or elsewhere in the State of Illinois, now is the time to take stock of each new law to determine whether it applies to your organization and what obligations it imposes.

Suburban Cook County Joins the City of Chicago in Raising the Minimum Wage for Non-Tipped Workers to $13 an Hour

As we previously reported, the City of Chicago is gradually moving to a minimum wage of $13 an hour by July 2019. On Wednesday, Cook County joined the City of Chicago in gradually increasing the minimum wage by approving a minimum wage increase for non-tipped workers to $13 an hour by July 2020.

Illinois Employees Hit the Sick Leave Trifecta: Important Changes to Take Effect in 2017

Three recently enacted laws expanding sick leave benefits within the state of Illinois will soon impact employers with operations in Illinois: the Illinois Employee Sick Leave Act (effective in January of 2017); the Chicago Paid Sick Leave Ordinance (effective in July of 2017); and the Cook County Earned Paid Sick Leave Ordinance (effective in July of 2017). Below is a summary of each law.

Cook County, Illinois Becomes First in the Midwest to Mandate Countywide Paid Sick Leave

On October 5, 2016, the Cook County Board of Commissioners passed the Cook County Earned Sick Leave Ordinance (the “Ordinance”). Notably, Cook County, Illinois encompasses the City of Chicago, which passed its own paid sick leave ordinance earlier this year.1 The Ordinance is nearly a carbon copy of Chicago’s paid sick leave law, and is slated to take effect on July 1, 2017, allowing employees to accrue up to 40 hours of paid sick leave in a 12-month period.

Following Chicago’s Lead, Cook County Requires Employers to Provide Paid Sick Leave to Employees

This summer, we reported that the City of Chicago had passed an ordinance requiring employers located in the City to provide paid sick leave to their employees. Last week, Cook County followed suit, passing a virtually identical version of Chicago’s ordinance that will apply to all employers within the county.