join our network! affiliate login  
Custom Search
GET OUR FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTERS!
Daily and Weekly Editions • Articles • Alerts • Expert Advice • Learn More

Cincinnati Bans Salary History Inquiries

On March 12, 2019, Cincinnati, Ohio passed an ordinance1 prohibiting employers from asking applicants about their salary history or current earnings. It is the latest large jurisdiction to pass such a measure, following several localities in New York that have recently passed similar ordinances.2

City of Cincinnati Passes Ordinance Prohibiting Salary Inquiry and Use

The City of Cincinnati has become the latest jurisdiction to adopt an ordinance prohibiting employers from asking about or relying on the prior salary history of prospective employees in setting starting pay.

Is Telecommuting a Reasonable Accommodation in Ohio?

In the recently issued decision in McDaniel v. Wilkie, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Ohio considered whether telecommuting constitutes a reasonable accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The short answer is that it can constitute a reasonable accommodation if it would enable an employee to satisfactorily perform the essential functions of his or her position and does not impose an undue burden on the employer.

Ohio Limits Joint Employment Status For Franchisors

Ohio recently amended its definition of “employer” in order to limit the joint employer status of franchisors. Effective March 20, 2019, franchisors will not be considered joint employers with their franchisees unless one of the following conditions is met:

Cuyahoga County, Ohio Employer of Four or More? Ordinance Expands LGBTQ Protections

Employees in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, now enjoy more expansive protections against discrimination than they do under Ohio and federal law. On September 25, 2018, the Cuyahoga County Council passed County Ordinance No. O2018-0009, entitled “An Ordinance enacting Chapter 206.13: Commission on Human Rights and Title 15: Anti-Discrimination to ensure equal opportunity and treatment for all citizens of Cuyahoga County.” The ordinance affords protective rights on the basis of two previously unprotected characteristics: sexual orientation and gender identity.

Lawyers on a Short Leash: Bar Admission Restrictions

Unlike most licensed professions, the practice of law can significantly restrict an attorney’s geographic mobility.

Ohio Legislature Proposes Major Reform of Ohio Employment Discrimination Law

The Ohio employment discrimination statute may be in for substantial changes. A bill aimed at comprehensive reform of Ohio’s employment discrimination statute (R.C. § 4112) has been introduced Ohio Legislature.

Selective Enforcement Not A Viable Defense to Non-Competition Agreements Under Ohio Law

Employers sometimes worry whether seeking to enforce their non-competes in some circumstances but not others might preclude enforcement altogether in the future. Not so, says one court. Applying Ohio law, the United States District Court for the Western District of Tennessee, in GCA Services v. ParCou, held in a discovery ruling that information regarding an employer’s selective enforcement of its non-competition agreements is irrelevant to the issue of whether such agreements are enforceable.

Ohio Limits Local Workplace Laws, Expands Concealed Carry Rights of Licensed Gun Holders

A new Ohio law mandates uniformity of laws across the state affecting wage-hour, paid sick and safe leave and other fringe benefits, and scheduling of employee work hours. Senate Bill 331 expressly prohibits cities and counties from adopting laws in these areas that differ from those enacted at the state and federal level. Senate Bill 331 goes into effect on March 20, 2017.

Ohio Means Business: New Law Prohibits Cities and Counties From Enacting Paid Sick Leave, Predictive Scheduling, and Minimum Wage Laws

Imagine you operate multiple business locations in Columbus, Ohio where 3 counties comprise the city proper and as many as 11 counties comprise the larger Columbus Metropolitan Area. Now imagine that each of those counties adopts their own local ordinance requiring paid sick leave as well as advance notice (and extra pay) to employees before you can change their work schedule. Perhaps a few of the counties also enact an increased minimum wage of $15 an hour –much like the proposal to increase the minimum wage that was supposed to be voted upon in Cleveland in May of 2017. Would you want to continue to do business in Columbus or would you curtail your growth in that city and look for a more employer friendly home for your future business locations?