join our network! affiliate login  
Custom Search
GET OUR FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTERS!
Daily and Weekly Editions • Articles • Alerts • Expert Advice • Learn More

Did the California Legislature Kill Arbitration?

Could be. Certainly, arbitration services should be concerned that their services may not command the interest they once did.

California Governor Brown Signing More New Employment Laws at End of 2014 Session (Part I)

The 2014 legislative session is over. But employers will be remembering this one for a long time. California Governor Jerry Brown signed a host of new laws at the end of the session. Many deal with narrow-cast and public sector-related funding issues, which I won't cover here. (You're welcome).

Governor Brown Signs Bill Making Companies Liable for Employment Violations of Independent Labor Contractor Companies

This weekend, California Governor Jerry Brown signed Assembly Bill 1897. This bill creates new Labor Code section 2810.3, which applies to all but a very limited number of companies with 25 or more employees (i.e., the “client employer”) that obtain or are provided workers to perform work within their “usual course of business” from companies that provide workers (i.e., “labor contractors”).

California's 2014 Bill Signings and Vetoes are Almost Complete

California Governor Jerry Brown has until next Tuesday, September 30, to sign or veto bills recently passed by the California Legislature.

Recent Changes to California Laws—the Healthcare Perspective

The efforts made by professional athletes seeking workers’ compensation benefits for injuries that they sustained on the playing field has resulted in a considerable amount of drama in the press. As a result, the California legislature has amended the state Workers’ Compensation Act to include coverage for some athletes. In-state athletes are covered. Out-of-state professional athletes may be covered if (a) the athlete played at least two years for a California sports team; or (b) played more than 20 percent of his or her career for a California sports team. While the situation is unlikely to arise for most healthcare providers or institutions, if a professional athlete seeks medical treatment, it may be wise to consider asking if the injury is work-related.

California Appellate Court Rules That California’s Prevailing Wage Laws Do Not Apply to Off-Site Fabrication

On August 27, 2014, the California Court of Appeal issued its decision in the long-anticipated Russ-Will case, Sheet Metal Workers’ International Association, Local 104 v. Duncan; Russ Will Mechanical, Inc., Court of Appeal of the State of California, First Appellate District, Division Three, No. A131489 (August 27, 2014). The court held that the California prevailing wage law does not apply to employees who fabricate materials for a public works project at a permanent, offsite manufacturing facility that is not exclusively dedicated to the project. It is a published decision, which means it is binding upon the California trial courts, the California Department of Industrial Relations (DIR), and the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement.

Deputy Sheriff Protected by Whistleblower Retaliation Law, California Court of Appeal Rules

The California Labor Code’s Section 1102.5(b) whistleblower protections are not limited to the first employee reporting alleged misconduct, the California Court of Appeal has ruled, affirming a judgment in favor of a deputy sheriff on his whistleblower retaliation claim. Hager v. County of Los Angeles, No. B238277 (Cal. Ct. App. Aug. 19, 2014).

California Adds ‘Abusive Conduct’ to Sexual Harassment Prevention Training for Supervisors

Employers subject to California’s mandatory “AB 1825” sexual harassment training requirement for supervisors will need to revise their programs to include prevention of “abusive conduct,” following an amendment (AB 2053) to California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA).

California Enacts Paid Sick Leave Law

With the enactment of the Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act of 2014 (AB1522), California has become the second state in the nation, after Connecticut, to mandate employers provide their employees, including part-time and temporary workers, paid sick leave.

Is the Los Angeles Minimum Wage Increasing to $13.25 per Hour?

On Monday, September 1 in a Labor Day speech, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti announced his proposal to increase the city’s minimum wage to $13.25 per hour by 2017, and to tie the minimum wage to the Consumer Price Index going forward. California’s minimum wage increased this summer to $9 per hour, and will increase again to $10 per hour in January of 2016.