join our network! affiliate login  
Custom Search
GET OUR FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTERS!
Daily and Weekly Editions • Articles • Alerts • Expert Advice • Learn More

Share The Patchwork of States Prohibiting Salary History Inquiries Grows to Include Vermont and Likely Connecticut

Vermont and likely Connecticut will soon join California, Delaware, Massachusetts, Oregon, and Puerto Rico (along with various cities and counties) in prohibiting salary history inquiries.

Vermont Enacts Salary History Inquiry Law

On May 11, 2018, Vermont Governor Phil Scott signed legislation restricting employers from making salary history inquiries. The new law, H. 294, effective July 1, 2018, prohibits asking a prospective, current, or former employee about or seeking information regarding his or her compensation history. For these purposes, compensation includes base compensation, bonuses, benefits, fringe benefits, and equity-based compensation. Under the new law, employers are also prohibited from requiring that a prospective employee’s current or past compensation satisfy minimum or maximum criteria for employment. If an employer discovers a prospective employee’s salary history, the employer may not determine whether to interview the prospective employee based on this information.

Vermont Bans Inquiries into Job Applicants’ Salary and Benefit History

Beginning July 1, 2018, employers in Vermont will be prohibited from requiring a prospective employee to disclose his or her salary and benefit history under legislation (H.B. 294) signed by Governor Phil Scott on May 11, 2018.

Vermont Joins Salary History Inquiry Ban Trend

Vermont has become the latest state to enact a salary history question ban as Governor Phil Scott signed a law on Friday to prohibit employers from asking such questions. The measure aims to reduce the wage gap between men and women for performing the same or similar work.

Vermont Legalizes Recreational Marijuana

Vermont has become the ninth state to legalize recreational marijuana with Governor Phil Scott signing a law this week. Notably, this marks the first recreational marijuana law to be enacted by a state legislature instead of a ballot initiative.

Vermont’s Governor Signs Recreational Marijuana Law

Vermont’s Governor Phil Scott signed a recreational marijuana law on January 22, 2018. The law is the first recreational marijuana law to be enacted by a state legislature without a ballot initiative. It will take effect on July 1, 2018.

Reminder: Vermont ‘Ban the Box’

The law prohibits an employer from requesting “criminal history record information,” including arrests, convictions, or sentences, on the initial employment application form, unless the individual is applying for a position for which state or federal law creates a mandatory or presumptive disqualification for employment, based on convictions for certain offenses, or the employer is subject to an obligation imposed by state or federal law not to employ an individual convicted of certain offenses.

Vermont’s Crackdown on Drug Testing Underscores the Importance of Compliant, State-Specific Drug Testing Policies for Multistate Employers

My unabashed love affair with the state of Vermont has been around for quite a while. Maple syrup, Phish, innovative ice cream, beautiful scenery, and a statewide ban on interstate billboards—what’s not to love? Another interesting feature about the Green Mountain State: Vermont prides itself on being extraordinarily restrictive on employers that wish to drug test their employees.

Vermont Passes “Ban the Box” Legislation

On May 3, 2016, Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin signed into law a “ban the box” statute, which will take effect on July 1, 2017. The law will prohibit covered employers from inquiring about information pertaining to an individual’s criminal history record on an initial employment application. The law does, however, allow an employer to inquire about an applicant’s criminal history record (i) during a job interview or (ii) once the applicant has been deemed otherwise qualified for the position.

Vermont Joins the Ranks of Cities and States that "Ban the Box"

On May 3, 2016, Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin signed a bill into law that prohibits most employers from requesting criminal history information on an employment application. The law adds a new section to the state statutory provisions on “unlawful employment practices.” Vermont’s new law continues the nationwide “ban-the-box” trend and follows closely on the heels of similar legislation enacted in other jurisdictions, including Austin, Texas, Portland, Oregon, and New York City.1