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New York Court Says Retailer Not Responsible For Unforeseeable Violence Against Patron

A federal district court in Brooklyn recently held that an employer does not owe a duty to protect patrons from assault unless the attack was “reasonably foreseeable,” specifying that businesses would only be put on such notice if similar attacks had occurred on or near the premises in the past. This decision should provide a measure of relief to New York retail operations, but also serves as a warning to take workplace safety concerns seriously (Cort v. Marshalls Department Store).

New York Governor Takes Aim at Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

New York employers should expect proposals to “combat sexual harassment in the workplace” in the 2018-2019 Executive Budget or as standalone proposals, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announced in his 2018 State of the State address on January 3, 2018.

New York Legislators Introduce Bills on Workplace Sexual Harassment, Retaliatory Action

Preventing sexual harassment in the workplace and clarifying the definition of retaliatory action are the topics of two bills introduced on the first day of New York’s 2018 legislative session.

Court Lowers Punitive Damages Bar In Claims Against NYC Employers

The state’s highest court might have just made life more difficult for employers facing liability under New York City’s anti-bias law. Clarifying a question left open by New York City’s Human Rights Law (NYCHRL), the New York Court of Appeals recently held that the standard for determining punitive damages under the NYCHRL should be whether the employer engaged in discrimination with willful or wanton negligence, or recklessness, or a conscious disregard of the rights of others or conduct so reckless as to amount to such disregard.

New York Rings in New Year with Wage & Hour Presents: A Preview of Upcoming Changes

While the federal minimum wage for non-exempt employees has remained unchanged at $7.25 per hour since 2009, and the federal salary level for exempt employees has been stymied in litigation and rulemaking since 2014, New York State has forged ahead on the wage and hour front for 2018. The state has increased the minimum wage for non-exempt employees and the salary level for exempt employees, modified tip credit amounts available to tipped employees, and imposed other changes to wage credits.

New Year, New Pay: A State-by-State Roundup of Minimum Wage Increases for 2018

In 2018, the federal minimum wage will remain at $7.25 per hour for non-tipped employees and $2.13 per hour for tipped employees.

New York City Council Passes Bill Requiring Employers to Engage Employees in Accommodations Dialogue

The New York City Council has passed a bill requiring entities covered by the New York City Human Rights Law (HRL) to engage in cooperative dialogue with individuals who may be entitled to reasonable accommodations under the Law. Passed on December 19, 2017, Int. 804-A applies to employers, providers of public accommodations, and providers of housing accommodations.

New York City Employers Must Grant Temporary Work Schedule Changes under Bill Passed by City Council

he New York City Council has passed a bill to protect employees in the City who seek temporary changes to their work schedules for a “personal event.” The bill also protects employees from employer retaliation for making certain other schedule change requests.

New Year, New Laws In New York

The New Year will bring a number of new employment laws to the Empire State and Big Apple. All employers with operations in New York should take note of these new laws — as well as significant laws that went into effect in late 2017— to ensure compliance with changing obligations.

Employers: Paid Family Leave is IN and Salary Inquiries are OUT

Recent employment legislation in New York State and New York City affords new benefits and protections to employees and job applicants. These laws also bring new obligations for employers. Before the holiday season is in full swing, employers should take steps to ensure compliance with the two laws described below