join our network! affiliate login  
Custom Search
GET OUR FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTERS!
Daily and Weekly Editions • Articles • Alerts • Expert Advice • Learn More

New York Issues Final Paid Family Leave Law Regulations

The New York Paid Family Leave Benefits Law (“PFLBL”), passed last year and effective January 1, 2018, will provide eligible employees with a paid, job-protected leave of absence, starting at 8 weeks in 2018 and eventually reaching 12 weeks by 2021. Employees may use paid family leave to bond with a new child, to care for a family member with a serious health condition, or to assist with family obligations when a family member is called to active military service. The wage replacement benefits, with certain exceptions, will be funded through payroll deductions, cover 50% of the employee’s average weekly wage commencing in 2018, subject to a statutory cap, and reach 67% or the statutory cap by 2021.1

New York City Adopts New ‘Ban the Box’ Regulations, Continues Expansion of Employee Rights

Although New York City’s “ban the box” law, the Fair Chance Act (“FCA”), went into effect close to two years ago, the New York City Commission on Human Rights’ final regulations became effective on August 5, 2017. These regulations expand on the previously issued Enforcement Guidance (New York City Issues Enforcement Guidance Related to City’s Fair Chance Act) and both clarify and impose additional obligations on employers in screening applicants and existing employees for promotions.

New York City Final Regulations Clarify and Expand 'Ban the Box' Law

Final regulations clarifying and expanding New York City's "ban the box" law - the Fair Chance Act (FCA) - take effect August 5, 2017.

Final Regulations Clarifying and Expanding New York City "Ban the Box" Law Take Effect on August 5, 2017

New York City’s Fair Chance Act (FCA), which took effect October 27, 2015, imposes affirmative obligations on covered employers and employment agencies regarding when they may conduct criminal background checks on job applicants, and what process must be followed before making an adverse decision on the basis of an applicant’s criminal history. It is one of the nation’s most comprehensive "ban the box" laws restricting employers’ use of criminal history in the employment process.1 The New York City Commission on Human Rights ("the Commission") released comprehensive interpretive Enforcement Guidance regarding the FCA on November 5, 2015. In February, 2016, the Commission issued proposed regulations, and a public hearing regarding the proposed regulations was held on March 21, 2016.2

New York Paid Family Leave Regulations Finalized

In Spring 2016 we notified you of legislation enacting a 12-week paid family leave policy in New York. The New York Paid Family Leave Act (PFL) is a series of amendments to the state Workers’ Compensation Law set to take effect on January 1, 2018. PFL allows eligible employees to take paid leave time to care for a newborn, a covered service member, or a family member who has a serious health condition.

Proposed New York City Council Legislation Would Add Private Right of Action to Earned Sick Time Act and Prohibit Non-Competes for Low-Wage Employees

New legislation introduced in the New York City Council would add a private right of action to the Earned Sick Time Act (Introduction 1667) and prohibit employers from entering into a covenant not to compete with any low-wage employee of that employer (Introduction 1663).

New York State Appellate Court Finds Arbitration Agreement Requiring Employees to Bring Claims Individually Violates The National Labor Relations Act

On July 18, 2017, in Gold v. New York Life Ins. Co., New York’s Appellate Division, First Department1 issued a decision that directly contradicted the decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in Sutherland v. Ernst & Young, LLP.2

New York Employment Law Changes Expand Worker Rights and Employer Obligations

When it comes to state and municipal employment legislation, the Empire State and the Big Apple are leading the way in seeking to level the playing field between employers and employees by ensuring workers a fair wage, added leave protections and predictable schedules. Thus, it is critical for New York State and New York City employers to be up to speed and know how these laws will affect the workplace in 2017 and going forward.

Final New York Paid Family Leave Regulations Released: What Employers Need to Know

The Workers’ Compensation Board adopted the final regulations for New York’s new Paid Family Leave Benefits Law (PFL) on July 19, 2017. Final Regulations were issued previously by the Department of Financial Services on May 16, 2017.

New York State Releases Draft Compensation Reporting Documents for State Contractors

In January, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo signed Executive Order 162, which requires most state contractors and subcontractors to disclose employee job title and salary data, in addition to the equal employment opportunity information (such as sex, race, and ethnicity) already required.