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Michigan Bars State Employer Inquiries into Salary History

One week after taking office, Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer signed a directive that prohibits state departments and agencies from asking about current or previous salaries until after extending a conditional offer of employment with proposed salary. Executive Directive No. 2019-10, intended to ensure equal pay for equal work among state employees, went into effect immediately upon receiving the governor’s signature on January 8, 2019.

Michigan Recognizes Sexual Orientation as a Protected Class for State Contracts

On December 27, 2018, as one of his last acts in office, term-limited Michigan governor Rick Snyder signed an executive directive which will extend sexual orientation discrimination protection to a number of private employees. The governor’s executive directive, which is an order dictating how statewide executive branch departments and agencies are to act, requires all such departments and agencies to include covenants in procurement contracts prohibiting any contractor or subcontractor from discriminating against an employee or applicant for employment on the basis of sexual orientation or “gender identity or expression.” Such a prohibition must also be a condition for any grant or loan involving state funds to a public or private entity. The directive became immediately effective for all contracts, grants, or loans made or modified after December 27, 2018.

Michigan’s Minimum Wage Rate to Increase on March 29, 2019

In 2018, the Michigan Legislature passed two seemingly conflicting pieces of legislation addressing future minimum wage increases. Now that 2019 is here, many employers may be confused about what the changes are and when they become effective.

Answers to Your Frequently Asked Questions About Michigan’s Paid Medical Leave Act

On December 14, Michigan Governor Rick Snyder signed the Paid Medical Leave Act into law. The act requires covered employers to provide paid sick leave to many of their Michigan-based employees. Below are answers to frequently asked questions about the new law.

Michigan Amends New Minimum Wage, Paid Sick Leave Laws

Last week, Governor Rick Snyder signed amendments to Michigan's new minimum wage and paid sick leave laws. The laws were passed in September by the GOP-led state legislature to preempt passage of ballot initiatives in the November election to raise Michigan's minimum wage and require employers to offer paid sick leave. Both new laws will become effective 91 days after the legislature officially adjourns for the year (expected December 20).

Michigan Amends Paid Sick Leave Law

Michigan joined other states with paid sick leave laws on September 5, 2018, enacting the Earned Sick Time Act. Now, amidst political controversy, the Earned Sick Time Act (which never became effective) has been amended and renamed the Michigan Paid Medical Leave Act. The Act requires employers in Michigan to provide their employees with accrued paid leave to use for their own or their family members’ medical needs and for purposes related to domestic violence and sexual assault.

Michigan Governor Signs Amended Paid Sick Leave and Minimum Wage Laws

On December 14, 2018, Michigan’s employment law landscape dramatically changed—again—when Michigan Governor Rick Snyder (R) signed Senate Bills (SB) 1171 and 1175. These lame duck session bills overhaul the recently revised minimum wage and tip law and newly created paid sick and safe time law, respectively. Earlier this year, the Republican-controlled legislature adopted as law two proposed ballot measures covering these topics. As many expected, the legislature moved swiftly after the election to amend these laws before the changes took effect. This article highlights the more notable changes.

Michigan’s Senate and House of Representatives Adopt Changes to the Paid Sick Leave Act

On December 4, 2018, the Michigan Senate and House of Representatives passed the Paid Medical Leave Act, which makes wholesale changes to the state’s paid sick leave proposal and is on its way to Governor Rick Synder for his signature. On September 5, 2018, the two chambers adopted a citizen-initiated paid leave ballot proposal. This action removed the paid sick leave initiative from the November 2018 general elections ballot and allowed the Michigan Senate and House to craft changes that protect the core concept of paid leave while making the law less administratively difficult for Michigan employers. For example, the substitute bill limits the scope of coverage, reduces the level of benefits, and alleviates the administrative burdens of the ballot initiative.

A Fact Sheet on Michigan’s Newly-Passed Marihuana Ballot Initiative

On the night of November 6, 2018, Michigan voters passed the ballot initiative known as the “Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act” (MRTMA) to allow the limited use and possession of marihuana. As a result, the possession and use of marihuana (up to 2.5 ounces) within a personal residence by adults over the age of 21will be legal. The proposal will also allow regulated commercial production and distribution of marihuana.

Michigan Passes Paid Sick Leave Law

On September 5, 2018, Michigan became the 11th state to enact a mandatory paid sick leave law — the Earned Sick Time Act. The act was a citizen petition-initiated measure that the state legislature approved.