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Michigan Court of Appeals Rules in Favor of Employer in Medical Marijuana Case

On February 19, 2019, the Michigan Court of Appeals issued a ruling in Eplee v. City of Lansing, clarifying that the Michigan Medical Marihuana Act (MMMA) does not create “an independent right protecting the medical use of marijuana in all circumstances, nor does it create a protected class for users of medical marijuana.”

Michigan Employers Can Refuse to Hire Medical Marijuana Users

In an unpublished opinion, a state appellate court held the Michigan Medical Marihuana Act (MMMA) did not provide a cause of action for an applicant whose conditional job offer from the City of Lansing was rescinded after he tested positive for marijuana during a mandatory pre-employment drug test. Eplee v. City of Lansing, 2019 Mich. App. LEXIS 277 (Feb. 19, 2019). This is at least the second decision involving failed drug tests, medical marijuana, and the MMMA; both were decided in the employer’s favor.

Michigan Attorney General Asked to Issue Formal Opinion on the Constitutionality of the “Adopt and Amend” Process Used to Enact Paid Medical Leave and Minimum Wage Laws

Employers in Michigan have been on a roller coaster ride over the last several months regarding new paid sick leave and minimum wage requirements.

Get Ready! Michigan’s Paid Medical Leave Act Will Be Here Before You Know It

In one of his last acts in office, former Governor Rick Snyder signed Michigan’s Paid Medical Leave Act into law, which will for the first time require employers in the state to provide paid sick leave to their workforces. Although the statute was just signed on December 14, the effective date of the new law is right around the corner: March 29, 2019. What do employers need to know about this significant development?

Michigan Governor Furthers LGBT Protections in State Contracts and Bans State Agencies From Asking for Salary History

Hitting the ground running, Michigan’s new governor, Gretchen Whitmer, has imposed new requirements in the employment arena—but only for executive branch state employees and some contractors and grant and loan recipients. This could be a sign of things to come for employers everywhere in Michigan, or at least a sign of building momentum within the state government.

Michigan Bars State Employer Inquiries into Salary History

One week after taking office, Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer signed a directive that prohibits state departments and agencies from asking about current or previous salaries until after extending a conditional offer of employment with proposed salary. Executive Directive No. 2019-10, intended to ensure equal pay for equal work among state employees, went into effect immediately upon receiving the governor’s signature on January 8, 2019.

Michigan Recognizes Sexual Orientation as a Protected Class for State Contracts

On December 27, 2018, as one of his last acts in office, term-limited Michigan governor Rick Snyder signed an executive directive which will extend sexual orientation discrimination protection to a number of private employees. The governor’s executive directive, which is an order dictating how statewide executive branch departments and agencies are to act, requires all such departments and agencies to include covenants in procurement contracts prohibiting any contractor or subcontractor from discriminating against an employee or applicant for employment on the basis of sexual orientation or “gender identity or expression.” Such a prohibition must also be a condition for any grant or loan involving state funds to a public or private entity. The directive became immediately effective for all contracts, grants, or loans made or modified after December 27, 2018.

Michigan’s Minimum Wage Rate to Increase on March 29, 2019

In 2018, the Michigan Legislature passed two seemingly conflicting pieces of legislation addressing future minimum wage increases. Now that 2019 is here, many employers may be confused about what the changes are and when they become effective.

Answers to Your Frequently Asked Questions About Michigan’s Paid Medical Leave Act

On December 14, Michigan Governor Rick Snyder signed the Paid Medical Leave Act into law. The act requires covered employers to provide paid sick leave to many of their Michigan-based employees. Below are answers to frequently asked questions about the new law.

Michigan Amends New Minimum Wage, Paid Sick Leave Laws

Last week, Governor Rick Snyder signed amendments to Michigan's new minimum wage and paid sick leave laws. The laws were passed in September by the GOP-led state legislature to preempt passage of ballot initiatives in the November election to raise Michigan's minimum wage and require employers to offer paid sick leave. Both new laws will become effective 91 days after the legislature officially adjourns for the year (expected December 20).