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Kentucky Employers Must Be Represented by Counsel in Unemployment Compensation Hearings, Court Rules

Non-lawyers may no longer represent employers in unemployment compensation hearings in Kentucky, the Kentucky Court of Appeals has ruled. Nichols v. Kentucky Unemployment Commission, et al., No. 2017-CA-001156-MR, 2019 Ky. App. LEXIS 73 (Ky Ct. App. Apr. 26, 2019).

Non-Lawyers Can No Longer Represent Kentucky Employers At Unemployment Proceedings

The Kentucky Court of Appeals just held that non-lawyers may no longer represent employers in unemployment proceedings, ruling that such a practice is unconstitutional. As a result, you must immediately adjust any business practice that involves human resources managers, supervisors, or other non-lawyers handling such administrative proceedings.

Kentucky Enacts Pregnant Workers Act, Requiring Reasonable Accommodations for Pregnant and Lactating Employees

Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin (R) recently signed the Pregnant Workers Act, SB 18, to provide pregnancy-related accommodations for employees in the Bluegrass State. This measure amends the Kentucky Civil Rights Act (KCRA) to require employers to make reasonable accommodations for employees related to pregnancy and childbirth, and extends existing protections against retaliation and discrimination to cover pregnancy and childbirth.

Kentucky Adopts Pregnant Workers Act

Beginning June 27, 2019, Kentucky employers must provide reasonable accommodations to employees who are limited due to pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions, unless it would impose an undue hardship on the employer to do so.

Kentucky Adopts Pregnant Workers Act

Last week Governor Bevin signed Senate Bill 18, the Kentucky Pregnant Workers Act. The Act amends the Kentucky Civil Rights Act (KCRA) and applies to employers with 15 or more employees within the state in each of twenty (20) or more calendar weeks in the current or preceding calendar year, as well as any agent of the employer. The new law requires employers to provide reasonable accommodations to employees who are limited due to pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions, unless it would impose an undue hardship on the employer to do so. The law includes lactation and the need to express breastmilk for a nursing child as a related medical condition that must be reasonably accommodated absent undue hardship.

Kentucky Employers Face New Pregnancy Accommodation Law

Under a new law just signed into effect by Governor Matt Bevin yesterday, many Kentucky employers will need to change their human resources practices and provide reasonable accommodations to workers for pregnancy, childbirth, and related conditions. The new law went into effect upon signature, so employers will need to make adjustments immediately in order to stay in compliance. What exactly must Kentucky employers do?

Kentucky Enacts New Arbitration Law

On March 25, 2019, Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin signed into law a bill that reaffirms an employer’s right to use arbitration agreements. The law substantively amends the language of two state statutes: KRS § 336.700 and KRS § 417.050.

New Kentucky Law: Employers May Make Arbitration Mandatory as Condition of Employment or Continued Employment

The right of Kentucky employers to require arbitration as a condition of employment and continued employment has been restored by Senate Bill 7, signed by Governor Matt Bevin on March 25, 2019. The new law also provides certain safeguards for employees.

Kentucky Governor Signs Senate Bill 7 Into Law Reestablishing Employment Arbitration

Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin signed into law Senate Bill 7 which brings Kentucky back in line with every other state by allowing employers to require employees to arbitrate claims as a condition of employment. The new law, signed yesterday, also allows employers and employees to contractually limit the time period in which employees must file employment-related claims and specifically allows an employer to require, as a condition of employment, a background check. This is all very good news for Kentucky employers.

Kentucky Legislature Seeks To Reestablish Employment Arbitration

A Kentucky legislative leader has just taken the first step to try to resurrect the ability of employers to require employment disputes to be resolved by arbitration. Kentucky Senate President Robert Stivers has just introduced legislation (Senate Bill 7) to make clear that employers and employees may agree to arbitrate claims related to the employment.
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