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Total Articles: 7

Wage Violations Are Now “Public Record” Under Colorado’s New Wage Theft Transparency Act

On April 13, 2017, Governor Hickenlooper signed the Wage Theft Transparency Act into law, which is effective immediately. The Act makes “wage theft” violations in Colorado, including nonpayment of wages or overtime compensation, public record and subject to records requests under the Colorado Open Records Act.

Colorado Companions for Elderly Entitled to Overtime Pay

The minimum wage and overtime pay rules in Colorado’s Minimum Wage Order (MWO) apply to companions for the elderly or infirm who work for third-party employers, a federal judge in Colorado has ruled. Kennett v. Bayada Home Health Care, Inc., 14-cv-2005-CMA-MJW (D. Colo. Sept. 24, 2015).

Colorado's Minimum Wage Increased January 1

The Colorado minimum wage increased by 23 cents to $8.23 per hour on January 1, 2015. Tipped employees are entitled to receive at least $5.21 per hour. These increases to Colorado’s minimum wage rates reflect the annual adjustment for inflation required by the Colorado Constitution.

Colorado Raises Minimum Wage to $8.00 An Hour

On January 1, 2014, the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment increased the minimum wage in Colorado from $7.78 to $8.00 per hour and from $4.76 to $4.98 for tipped employees.

Colorado's Minimum Wage Increases 3.8%, to $7.64 Per Hour

Effective January 1, 2012, Colorado's minimum wage increased by $0.28, from $7.36 per hour to $7.64 per hour (for tipped employees, from $4.34 to $4.62). This is $0.39 more than the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour.

Colorado -- New Minimum Wage To Go Into Effect

On January 1, 2012 Colorado employers in a variety of industries will face an increase in the minimum wage. The 2012 minimum will be $7.64 (up from the 2011 rate of $7.36) and will affect employers in the retail and service, food and beverage, commercial support service, and health and medical industries.

New Colorado Law Clamps Down on Employers Who Misclassify Workers.

On June 2, 2009, Governor Ritter signed into law H.B. 1310 paving the way for any person to file complaints with the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment ("CDOLE") asserting that an employer has improperly classified an employee as an independent contractor. The new law became effective immediately and imposes a fine of $5,000 per misclassified employee, which could jump to $25,000 for a second or subsequent offense. Additionally, repeat offenders could be barred from contracting with the state for up to two years.