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Total Articles: 15

New FLSA Overtime Exemption Regulations Still Under Consideration By Department of Labor

Earlier this week, Secretary of Labor Perez announced that her agency is still working hard on revising the regulations governing the existing white collar overtime exemptions. These regulations were originally expected to be published in early 2015. However, that did not happen. Secretary Perez now expects that the regulations will be finalized and published this spring.

Calif. Employers Must Take Care With Overtime Exemptions

For those of us who work with employees in highly specialized fields, it is important to never lose track of the recurring issue of whether exempt classification of employees for overtime purposes is appropriate. While all employers should make it a practice to evaluate the classification of employment positions, employers in the professional and technical industries, such as engineers, architects and contractors, should pay close attention to whether the professional exemption correctly applies to certain skilled employees.

New California Law Requires Overtime Pay for Personal Attendants

On September 26, 2013, Governor Jerry Brown signed into law a bill which entitles personal attendants in California to overtime pay. Previously, Industrial Welfare Commission Wage Order 15 provided a complete overtime exemption for all such workers. Beginning January 1, 2014, AB 241 mandates that personal attendants be paid one and one-half times their regular rate of pay for all hours worked in excess of nine hours in any workday and 45 hours in a workweek. Personal attendants include any persons employed by a private householder or by any third-party employer recognized in the healthcare industry to work in a private household, to supervise, feed, or dress a child, or a person who by reason of advanced age, physical disability, or mental deficiency needs supervision.

California Overtime Laws Extended To Visiting Employees

A unanimous California Supreme Court recently held that California-based employers must pay out-of-state resident employees pursuant to the more restrictive provisions of the California Labor Code even if these employees only visit the state on a limited, temporary basis. The unanimous decision held that the state's overtime laws were intended by the California legislature to apply broadly to "protect" workers visiting California (even temporarily); therefore, California's laws trump the laws of states in which employees actually reside and primarily work.

California Supreme Court Expands Reach Of State Overtime Laws

On June 30, 2011, the California Supreme Court ruled that work performed in California by nonresident employees for California-based employers is covered by the California Labor Code and its unfair competition laws. That means that employees residing in states outside California but working (even occasionally) in California may bring lawsuits against their California employers for unfair competition based on violations of California's generous overtime requirements. This is not good news for employers.

Do California State Overtime Laws Apply to Visiting Workers?

Do you have employees who visit California for business? If so, now may be a good time to brush up on California wage and hour law. On June 30, 2011, the California Supreme Court ruled that the California Labor Code's overtime provisions applied to three non-resident employees of Oracle Corporation who performed work within the state.

California Supreme Court Extends Reach of State’s Wage and Hour Laws to Out-Of-State Employees Temporarily Working Within the State

On June 30, 2011, a unanimous California Supreme Court ruled that California-based employers must pay out-of-state resident employees pursuant to the more restrictive provisions of the California Labor Code even if these employees visit the state on a limited, temporary basis. The unanimous decision held that the state’s overtime laws were intended by the California legislature to apply broadly to “protect” workers visiting California even temporarily and, therefore, this state’s laws trump the laws from the states in which employees actually reside and primarily work. Sullivan v. Oracle Corp., No. S170577, California Supreme Court (June 30, 2011).

Non-Exempt Employees Can Agree To A Salary That Includes Overtime

A California appellate court ruled that Labor Code section 515 does not outlaw clear wage agreements that provide for salaries that include fixed amounts of overtime. Arechiga v. Dolores Press, Inc.

Annual Bonuses: Are They Factored Into Overtime?

Many employers question whether annual bonuses must be considered in overtime compensation. Although California law has more protective overtime laws than most states, it sticks with federal law with regard to what is included in the "regular rate" when calculating overtime. Federal law requires "all remuneration" to be included in the regular rate except for seven specified types of payments. Among these excludable payments are discretionary bonuses, gifts and payments in the nature of gifts on special occasions, contributions by the employer to certain welfare plans and payments made by the employer pursuant to certain profit-sharing, thrift and savings plans.

Federal Court Withdraws Decision Awarding Overtime to Non-Residents Who Work In California.

As we reported in our last issue (California Wage/Hour Update, No. 1, January 2009), the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit recently ruled that the overtime provisions of California's Labor Code apply to work performed in California by non-resident employees. Sullivan v. Oracle Corporation.

Federal Decision Awards Overtime to Non-Residents Performing Work in California.

A federal appeals court recently handed down a significant decision addressing the application of the overtime provisions of California's Labor Code to work performed in California by non-resident employees. The case has important consequences for employers who hire non-residents to perform work in California Sullivan v. Oracle Corporation.

The Explosion of Overtime Claims (Part 2).

In our last issue we looked at some of the most important timekeeping problems that employers should be aware of, in order to keep from being engulfed in the virtual tsunami of overtime claims being filed in recent years.

State Reduces Thresholds for California Computer Professionals' Overtime Exemption: Changes Take Effect Immediately.

Last week Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger approved an amendment substantially changing the law concerning overtime pay for certain computer software professionals. The law amends the California Labor Code and restores the overtime exemption for qualifying computer programmers, analysts and engineers who are paid a monthly salary equivalent to at least $75,000 per year, or who continue to be paid at least $36 per hour for all hours worked. The bill was passed as urgency legislation and took effect on September 30, 2008.

The Explosion of Overtime Claims (Part 1)

Employers in California are still being pummeled with claims by current and former employees seeking compensation for allegedly unpaid overtime. Employers should tackle this problem by conducting self-audits and improving internal procedures for eliminating overtime complaints. The fact is, many overtime claims have identifiable causes and are completely avoidable.

Court Affirms: Holiday Pay Premiums May Be Credited Toward Overtime Obligations.

California law sets out basic overtime requirements for non-exempt employees in California. Among other things, the law requires an employer to pay an employee time and one-half of the employee's regular rate of pay for both 1) more than 8 hours of work in one workday, and2) more than 40 hours of work in any workweek. A double time premium is required for hours in excess of 12 in a work day, or in excess of 8 hours on the seventh consecutive day of work in a work week.