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Total Articles: 8

Paying Most Sales Employees Purely on Draw and Commission No Longer Lawful In California

Last month a California appellate court held that an employer violates California law by paying inside sales employees on a draw against commission. In Vaquero v. Stoneledge Furniture LLC, the court held that such a pay arrangement does not compensate employees for their mandatory paid rest breaks and other non-selling working time.

California Auto Dealers Beware: Commission-Paid Dealership Employees Entitled To Separate Rest Period Pay

A California appellate court ruled on February 28, 2017, that employees paid on a commission basis must be separately compensated for legally required rest periods (Vaquero v. Stoneledge Furniture LLC). Although this decision did not specifically involve automobile dealerships, this decision could impact any dealerships in California compensating individuals completely or partially on a commission basis (e.g., salespersons, finance managers, service advisors). If your dealership is in this category, you should review this decision to determine whether you need to immediately adjust your pay practices.

California Court Rules Commission-Paid Employees Are Entitled To Separate Rest Period Pay

A California appellate court ruled yesterday that workers paid on a commission basis must be separately compensated for legally required rest periods (Vaquero v. Stoneledge Furniture LLC). When combined with a state Supreme Court ruling late last year requiring employers to provide workers with duty-free rest breaks, this one-two punch of court decisions will force many California employers to alter their pay practices or face potentially devastating financial consequences.

New Rules For Commission-Paid Employees Take Effect January 1, 2013

Effective January 1, 2013, a new California law requires that employees entering into employment agreements which involve compensation, even in part, on a “commission” basis must be provided a written contract which sets forth the method by which the commission is computed and paid. Employers must provide the employee with a signed copy of the commission agreement and obtain a signed acknowledgment of receipt of the copy. We first reported on this in a Legal Alert, which you can access here.

New California Law Affects Commission-Paid Employees

Beginning January 1, 2013, a new California law requires that employees who are paid on commission must be provided a written contract which sets forth the method by which the commission shall be computed and paid. This new law further requires that the employer provide a signed copy of the commission agreement to the employee and obtain a signed receipt for it.

Commissioned-Salesperson Ruling Is Big Win For Employers

Employers who have commission-sales employees working under two California Wage Orders recently received good news from a California appellate court which essentially clarified and strengthened the commission-sales exemption contained in Section 3D of Wage Orders 4-2001 (certain listed occupations) and 7-2001 (mercantile). Muldrow et al v. Surrex Solutions Corporation.

Court Clarifies Meaning Of "Commissions"

California Industrial Welfare Commission (IWC) Wage Orders exempt from California's overtime-compensation requirement "any employee whose earnings exceed one and one-half (1 ½ ) times the minimum wage if more than half of that employee's compensation represents commissions." State courts have looked to the Labor Code section that addresses automobile dealers, in defining "commissions," as: "compensation paid to any person for services rendered in the sale of such employer's property or services and based proportionately upon the amount or value thereof." (Italics added.)

Button Up Those Commission Plans.

An employer recently found itself in the unenviable position of defending a lawsuit brought by a former sales employee, who alleged that the employer owed him a commission of 20% on a $12 million deal he brokered with AT&T. After three and a half years of litigation, an appellate court ruled in the employer's favor because the salesperson's employment agreement contained two critical provisions. Would your company's commission plan pass the same test? Nein v. HostPro, Inc.