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Total Articles: 10

Louisiana Updates its Data Breach Notification Law

And now it’s Louisiana’s turn! After several states recently enacted or strengthened existing data breach notification laws (Colorado, Arizona, South Dakota and Alabama just to name a few…), on May 20th , Louisiana Governor John Edwards signed an amendment to the state’s Database Security Breach Notification Law (Act 382) which will take effect August 1, 2018.

Louisiana #MeToo Law Requires Sexual Harassment Policies, Training, and Reporting for State Agencies

Less than a year after the #MeToo movement began in earnest, it continues to impact boardrooms and statehouses. In May of 2018, Louisiana became the latest state to take action in support of the #MeToo movement, with its lawmakers unanimously approving a statewide anti-sexual harassment policy—though they limited the law to state agencies and their employees for the time being.

Louisiana Court Upholds Discharge of Worker With a Pregnancy-Related Illness Who Violated a Company Rule

The Louisiana Court of Appeal, Fourth Circuit recently held that a pregnant employee who suffered from a pregnancy-related illness was not disabled within the scope and meaning of the Louisiana Employment Discrimination Law (LEDL). According to the court, the employee had failed to establish that her illness qualified as a disability under state law. Brown v. The Blood Center, No. 2017-CA-0750 (March 15, 2018).

Louisiana Supreme Court Rejects Governor’s Appeal of LGBT Executive Order Ruling

On March 23, 2018, in a 4–3 decision, the Louisiana Supreme Court refused to consider Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards’s appeal of the Louisiana First Circuit Court of Appeal’s November 1, 2017, decision holding that Governor Edwards lacked the constitutional authority to issue an executive order protecting lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) state employees from discrimination. More specifically, the Louisiana Supreme Court let stand the First Circuit’s ruling that Executive Order JBE 2016 – 11, which sought to protect the rights of LGBT individuals and other protected classes from discrimination by Louisiana agencies, departments, and contractors was unconstitutional.

Fifth Circuit Emphasizes Narrowed Liability for Employee Transfer Under the Louisiana Whistleblower Statute

The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Louisiana’s grant of summary judgment under the Louisiana whistleblower law, Louisiana Revised Statutes section 23:967, in favor of an employer that transferred an employee to a less desirable location after revealing concerns about her employer’s handling of a diabetic student. Rayborn v. Bossier Parish School Board, No. 16-30903 (February 2, 2018).

Louisiana Court Upholds Ruling That House Painters Are Independent Contractors

The Louisiana Fifth Circuit Court of Appeal has held that painters may be treated as independent contractors if they bring some of their own tools, control their own schedules, and make decisions on how to complete the work for which they have been hired.

Louisiana Governor Appeals LGBT Executive Order Ruling to State Supreme Court

On December 1, 2017, Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards (D) appealed a state appellate court decision holding that Executive Order JBE 2016 – 11, which seeks to protect the rights of lesbian, bisexual, gay, transgender individuals, and other protected classes from discrimination by Louisiana agencies, departments and contractors was unconstitutional.

What Louisiana Employers Need for an Effective Harassment Policy

Workplace harassment is one of the many problems that Louisiana employers may encounter. The national media has recently published several stories concerning high-profile cases of sexual predation and harassment. In addition, stories have surfaced in Southeast Louisiana of allegedly rampant sexual harassment at a New Orleans-based restaurant group. While recent media accounts have focused on sexual harassment, harassment may also be based on disability, religion, age, race, gender, and a variety of other traits. While employers can entirely erase the risk of unlawful harassment in a particular workplace, there are well-established methods of preventing harassment and addressing harassment claims if they do arise.

Louisiana Court Treats Inevitable Disclosure Provision as Non-Compete Clause Subject to Geographic Restrictions

May an employer enforce a contract provision that forbids an employee to leave and take another job that would require him to use or reveal the employer’s confidential information? In Louisiana, maybe not, unless the agreement complies with Louisiana’s non-compete statute, La. Rev. Stat. § 23:921.

Increased Focus on Misclassification of Workers as Independent Contractors Will Continue in Louisiana

On October 25, 2017, the Louisiana Workforce Commission (“LWC”) issued a press release acknowledging the efforts of a task force which combats the misclassification of employees as independent contractors. The task force, known as “Government Against Misclassified Employees Operational Network” (“GAME ON”), is made up of members of the LWC’s Unemployment Insurance and Office of Workers’ Compensation divisions and the Louisiana Department of Revenue, with cooperative agreements with the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) and the U.S. Department of Labor’s (“DOL”) Wage & Hour Division.