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Total Articles: 10

Kentucky's Electronic Recordkeeping Rule Is In Effect!

The December 1 compliance date for federal OSHA’s new electronic recordkeeping portion of the new recordkeeping regulation is fast approaching. Known as “Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses,” the new federal OSHA rule will require certain employers with more than 20 employees to electronically submit injury records that will be posted on OSHA’s website.

Kentucky Supreme Court Opens the Door to State Wage and Hour Class Actions

On August 24, 2017, the Supreme Court of Kentucky issued its long-awaited decision in McCann, et al. v. The Sullivan University System, Inc., No. 2015-SC-000144-DG (2017), surprising many by overruling the Court of Appeals decision below and opening the door to class actions in Kentucky state courts for alleged violations of Kentucky’s wage and hour statute.

The Long And Winding Road: Wage And Hour Class Actions Now Viable In Kentucky

The Kentucky Supreme Court ruled today that wage and hour class actions for unpaid wages may be maintained in the state, the first-ever time such lawsuits have been ruled viable. The court’s decision concludes more than a decade of uncertainty surrounding the proper interpretation of the Kentucky Wages and Hours Act, and opens the door for significantly greater liability for Kentucky employers in the future (McCann v. Sullivan University System, Inc.).

Kentucky Passes Right-to-Work Law: FAQs on What This Means to Kentucky Employers and Their Employees

Kentucky has passed House Bill 1, the Kentucky Right to Work Act, making Kentucky the 27th state to adopt right-to-work legislation.

Kentucky Becomes the 27th Right-to-Work State and Repeals Its Prevailing Wage Law

In lightning-fast fashion, Kentucky became the 27th state to enact right-to-work legislation over the weekend. After the 2016 elections, in which Republicans took control of the Kentucky House of Representatives for the first time since 1920, right-to-work was at the top of the agenda. Governor Matt Bevin signed the bill (HB-1) into law on Saturday, January 7, 2017—the same day the bill was approved by the Senate and just two days after the House passed it. The law took effect immediately upon its passage.

Kentucky Becomes 27th Right-to-Work State

On January 9, Kentucky became the nation's 27th right-to-work state, making it illegal for workers to be required to join a union or pay dues as a condition of employment. Governor Matt Bevin signed the legislation, which is effective immediately.

Kentucky Enacts Right-to-Work Law

Over the weekend, Kentucky lawmakers passed a right-to-work bill, which was promptly signed by Governor Matt Bevin. The new law took immediate effect on January 9, 2017, making Kentucky the 27th state in the nation and the last state in the South to adopt such a measure.

Sixth Circuit Holds Employees’ Continuing Work Constitutes Assent to Mandatory Arbitration Agreement

The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals, in an unpublished decision, recently held that under Kentucky law, merely continuing to work for an employer constitutes assent to an arbitration agreement when that agreement is a condition of employment—even if the employee has not signed an acknowledgement form. Aldrich, et al. v. University of Phoenix, Inc., No. 16-5276 (6th Cir. October 24, 2016).

Kentucky High Court Strikes Down Louisville Minimum Wage Law; Lexington Law Also Affected

Local governments in Kentucky lack the authority to establish their own minimum wage rates, the Kentucky Supreme Court has ruled 6-1. Kentucky Restaurant Ass’n, et al. v. Louisville/Jefferson Cty. Metro Gov’t, 2015-SC-000371-TG (Oct. 20, 2016).

Kentucky Adopts Federal OSHA Recordkeeping Changes

The Kentucky Labor Cabinet’s Department of Workplace Standards, Division of Occupational Safety and Health Compliance has published its intent to adopt certain Federal OSHA Recordkeeping regulations, including the new electronic reporting and anti-retaliation provisions published in the May 12, 2016 Federal Register (view proposed regulations). States that have their own OSHA plan, such as Kentucky, are required to have OSHA programs that are at least as effective as Federal OSHA, and are consequently required to adopt and implement new federal standards, or a more stringent standard, within six (6) months of the adoption or amendment by Federal OSHA. This new rule in Kentucky is set to take effect on January 1, 2017.