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Total Articles: 10

Race-Based Minimum Wage Challenge Gets New Life in 11th Circuit

Alabama's Minimum Wage and Right-to-Work Act, which mandated a uniform minimum wage throughout the state, may have racially discriminated against the City of Birmingham's black citizens, the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled.

11th Circuit Revives Lawsuit Challenging Legality of Alabama’s Ban on Local Minimum Wage Ordinances

On July 25, 2018, the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals reversed a Birmingham federal judge’s dismissal of a lawsuit challenging the February 2016 Alabama Uniform Minimum Wage and Right to Work Act (commonly known as “the Minimum Wage Act”). The Minimum Wage Act provided the Alabama state legislature with the authority to control the regulation of wages within the state of Alabama, including the establishment of a state minimum wage. The passage of the Minimum Wage Act occurred shortly after the City of Birmingham passed an ordinance providing for an increase in the minimum wage for workers in Birmingham (including employees of private employers who perform work within the Birmingham city limits).

Last But Not Least, Alabama Passes Data Breach Notification Act

With Governor Kay Ivey’s signature on the Alabama Data Breach Notification Act on March 28, 2018, Alabama followed the lead of 49 other states in requiring protection of sensitive consumer information and notice of data breaches, as well as imposing consequences for failing to comply with the Act. The Act broadly applies to all people, businesses, and government entities that acquire or use sensitive personally identifying information (SPII) and may impact a range of entities like retail establishments, financial institutions, healthcare providers, government agencies, public and private colleges and universities, large employers, and more.

Alabama Becomes the Final State to Enact a Data Breach Notification Law

On March 28th, Alabama Governor Kay Ivey (R) signed into law the Alabama Data Breach Notification Act, Act No. 2018-396, making Alabama the final state to enact a data breach notification law. South Dakota Governor Dennis Daugaard signed into a law a similar statute one-week prior. The Alabama law will take effect May 1, 2018. Being the last state to enact a breach notification law, Alabama had the benefit of examining the approach in just about all of the other states and apparently drew provisions from many other state laws, including relatively detailed requirements for covered entities (as defined within the statute) and their third-party service providers to maintain reasonable requirements to protect “sensitive personally identifying information.”

Alabama Senates Passes Data Breach Notification Act

There are only two states in the U.S. that have yet to enact data breach notification laws, but that may change in 2018. Several weeks ago, the South Dakota state legislature announced that a data breach notification bill (Senate Bill No. 62) was pending. Now, Alabama is following suit.

City of Birmingham Passes Nondiscrimination Ordinance, Creates Human Rights Commission

On September 26, 2017, the Birmingham City Council passed an ordinance that makes it a crime for any entity doing business in the city to discriminate based on race, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or familial status. The ordinance passed unanimously and is the first of its kind in Alabama. Enforceable through the municipal courts, the local law applies to housing, public accommodations, public education, and employment. It carves out two exceptions: one for religious corporations and one for employers with bona fide affirmative action plans or seniority systems.

Called to Action: Alabama Provides Job Protections for Volunteer Firefighters and Emergency Responders

As catastrophic hurricanes threaten the southeastern region, Alabama employers may want to reflect on the state’s emergency response statute.

Alabama’s Restrictive Covenants Statute: New Insight on Retroactivity, Employee Training, and the Blue Pencil Rule

Alabama’s new restrictive covenant statute became effective on January 1, 2016. Recently published committee comments clarified certain provisions of the law. The following briefly summarizes the final committee comments relating to three significant provisions of the new law.

Alabama's New Non-Compete Statute Places New Restrictions on Employers

Executive Summary: Effective January 1, 2016, Alabama passed a new non-compete and non-solicitation statute, repealing § 8-1-1 of the Alabama Code (the "New Act"). The New Act attempts to codify principles the Alabama courts have previously addressed.

Oxford, Alabama, City Council Repeals Bathroom Ordinance Targeting Transgender Individuals

The Oxford, Alabama, City Council has repealed on May 4, 2016, an ordinance it passed a week previously that barred transgender people from using a bathroom that corresponds with their gender identity.