Virtual Office
Posted: 08 October 2008 01:13 PM   [ Ignore ]
Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  18
Joined  2008-03-04

We will be making our first foray into the virtual office.  We are hiring 2 salespeople who, after the training period, will be working from their homes.

I’m looking for issues that I may have overlooked besides the following:
1.  Attendance
2.  Workers Comp liability
3.  Computer/Email/Information Tech security

Anything else I may not have thought of?  Thanks.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 October 2008 12:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
New Member
Rank
Total Posts:  1
Joined  2008-10-09

Outside Salepeople are easy, froma wage and hour perspective, as normally exempt. I woud be interested in knowing what people are doing to track work time with non-exempt people working at home.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 October 2008 12:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  14
Joined  2008-03-04

home workers: think about workplace safety. besides comp, you’re still responsible for providing a safe workplace.

at the turn of the century, an OSHA letter about inspecting “home-based” workers raised a kerfuffle—until OSHA withdrew it and admitted they wouldn’t try to inspect home workers. even so, is there a fire hazard with the wiring in the home office? (because you’re liable) any slip-and-fall hazards? (because you’re liable) is the package delivery guy with the work-related document going to rob/assault/etc. your worker? (because you’re liable)

outside sales: outside salespeople aren’t exempt if they work primarily from a home office (it counts as their employer’s workplace). outside sales people must spend their time primarily “away from their employers’ place of business” or any fixed location (e.g., they mostly should spend their time traveling or at a customer’s place of business).

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 October 2008 01:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  18
Joined  2008-03-04

These will be traveling outside salespeople because and are not “order takers”.  They will spend a majority of their time on the road at customers’ plants and companies selling our products.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 14 October 2008 09:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Member
Avatar
RankRank
Total Posts:  15
Joined  2008-08-12

Most important thing in a work-from-home policy is making it clear that working from home is a privilege and not a right.  The Company has to reserve the right to rescind the authorization at any time for any reason on x notice and the employee understands that he/she may be required to work from the office or be deemed to have abandoned the job.  Other issues:  (1) whether you are going to reimburse for “travel” expenses when the employee is required to come into the office for meetings, etc.; (2) whether the Company is paying for internet access or phone charges; (3) a pledge by the employee that he/she has established at home a work space suitable for the tasks to be performed and that the employee will maintain that work space AND that the employee has made arrangements for child care so that when he/she is supposed to be working he/she is not also responsble for looking after any other person and can devote 100% attention to work.

For non-exempt employees, it’s a good idea to require the employee to submit daily time slips and certify daily that they have not performed any work outside the hours authorized and submitted.

Profile