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How Rising Minimum Wages Will Tie Employers’ Hands on New Overtime Rules

The increase in state and local minimum wages will limit the range of responses employers will have available to comply with the new Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) overtime rules.

Should we really be this panicked about the DOL overtime regs? Probably not.

By now, everyone is aware that on May 18, 2016, the Department of Labor (DOL) issued its final rule updating the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) overtime regulations. (Defining and Delimiting the Exemptions or Executive, Administrative, Professional, Outside Sales and Computer Employees.) Since then, there have been dozens of helpful articles, analyses, explanations, and in-person and electronic trainings to explain the rule. Panic is rampant, as employers attempt to understand the change to the regulations. But stay calm – it’s not that complicated.

ESL Teachers At Private Learning Center FLSA “Teachers” Exempt from Overtime

Earlier this week, in a matter of first impression within the Second Circuit, Judge P. Kevin Castel of the Southern District of New York held that employees who teach English as a second language (“ESL”) at a privately-owned ESL learning center qualify for the professional exemption under the FLSA as “teachers.” Fernandez v. Zoni Language Ctrs., 2016 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 65310 (S.D.N.Y. 2016).

Employment Law Update - Changes to the Overtime Pay Rules are Here

On May 18, 2016, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) issued its final rule on changes to four exemptions to the overtime pay requirement of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA): the executive, administrative, and professional (EAP) exemptions and the highly compensated employee exemption.

Retail and Hospitality Employers Grapple With the DOL's Final FLSA Part 541 Regulations

For over a year, retail and hospitality employers have been anxiously awaiting the issuance of the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) final overtime regulations—regulations which many had predicted would impact retail and hospitality employers more than most. Among their biggest fears was that the DOL would make changes to the duties test, increase the salary minimum to the highest level contemplated, and simultaneously disallow inclusion of bonuses to meet the salary minimum. Luckily, the DOL decided not to include any of those proposed changes in the final regulations. However, the changes that retail and hospitality employers will be required to implement by December 1, 2016 are expected to impact retail and hospitality businesses in a profound and negative way. According to David French, senior vice president for government relations at the National Retail Federation, a major industry group representing retailers and chain restaurants, “DOL’s new overtime rules are a massive failure. They are a failure of the regulatory process. They are a failure to listen. And, most of all, they are a failure to face reality.”

U.S. Department of Labor Publishes Final Rule on FLSA Overtime Regulations

On May 18, 2016, the U.S. Department of Labor published its Final Rule updating the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) overtime regulations regarding the executive, administrative and professional exemptions (the “FLSA White Collar Exemptions”). The Final Rule does not make any changes to the outside sales or computer professional exemptions.

New Minimum Salary Rule Holds Surprises for Employers – and They're Not All Bad

After more than two years of publicity and tremendous speculation surrounding what the new overtime regulations of the Fair Labor Standards Act ("FLSA") would look like after President Obama directed the Secretary of Labor to "modernize and streamline" them, the final version of the rule is finally here – and now the work really begins for employers. By now, we’re all familiar with the reasons behind the changes (but if you’re not, you can see our article here that links back to three earlier articles on the topic). So, let’s get to the nitty gritty of the actual changes to the overtime rule and what they mean for you.

U.S. Department of Labor Publishes Final Rule on FLSA Overtime Regulations

On May 18, 2016, the U.S. Department of Labor published its Final Rule updating the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) overtime regulations regarding the executive, administrative and professional exemptions (the “FLSA White Collar Exemptions”). The Final Rule does not make any changes to the outside sales or computer professional exemptions.

DOL's New Overtime Rule: Ready or Not, Here It Comes

The U.S. Department of Labor has issued its Final Rule setting forth a new salary threshold for the white collar exemption to the minimum wage and overtime requirement of the Fair Labor Standards Act. Effective December 1, 2016, the standard salary threshold for the white collar exemption will increase from $455 per week ($23,660 per year) to $913 per week ($47,476 per year), making an estimated 4.2 million American workers eligible for overtime when they work more than 40 hours in any work week. The DOL predicts that this change will result in more than $1.2 billion in additional wages paid to employees each year.

Storm Clouds and Silver Linings for Employers: An Analysis of the DOL’s Final FLSA Part 541 Regulations

The minimum salary threshold to qualify for the executive, administrative, and professional exemptions to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) will more than double on December 1, 2016, from $23,660 per year to $47,476 per year. This is the most notable—but not the only – change to the FLSA exemption requirements under the final Part 541regulations that the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) released today. Another noteworthy provision in the final Part 541 rule is one to automatically adjust this salary amount every three years beginning on January 1, 2020.