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401(k) Fee Litigation: Coming to a District Court Near You...

Until recently, the Carolinas were relatively immune to litigation surrounding alleged excessiveness of 401(k) plan fees. But last month in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of North Carolina, employees of big-box retailer Lowe’s filed a complaint alleging that the company’s fiduciary decisions to replace certain investments funds with a “largely untested” and “underperforming” alternative caused the loss of millions of dollars in potential earnings for plan participants. While fiduciary actions are common during economic downturns, this matter – coupled with the development of relevant case law – suggests that allegations involving 401(k) plan costs and lost investment opportunities may become just as common during a boom.

New Tax Law May Affect Mileage Reimbursement Policy for Employers

Outside of potential minimum wage issues, there is no federal law requiring employers to reimburse employees who use their personal vehicles for business purposes.

New Mental Health Parity Guidance and Enforcement Efforts May Warrant a Deep Dive Into Plan Administration

The Department of Labor (DOL), the Department of the Treasury, and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) are making good on their promise to issue more guidance and to aggressively enforce the federal Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 (MHPAEA) by recently issuing a slew of new guidance, enforcement statistics, and promises of continued aggressive enforcement.

Excessive Executive Compensation and the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017: Widening the Net of Negative Tax Consequences for For-Profit and Non-Profit Corporations

With all the national press coverage about tax savings, tax cuts and company bonus payments associated with the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (the “Tax Act”), it is easy to miss the changes in federal tax laws that impose substantial negative tax consequences on employers that pay certain executives an amount of compensation that Congress has deemed “excessive.” In this particular area, the changes brought about by the Tax Act do not cut taxes. Rather, for many for-profit and non-profit corporations, the Tax Act creates new taxes.

IRS Resolves 2018 HSA Contribution Limit Confusion

Acknowledging “numerous unanticipated administrative and financial burdens,” the IRS officially revoked its earlier attempt to lower the 2018 health savings account (HSA) contribution limits. In guidance issued on April 26, the IRS announced that the 2018 HSA contribution limit for taxpayers with family coverage will be $6,900 as originally announced in 2017 – not the reduced $6,850 limit that was unexpectedly revealed earlier this year.

IRS Issues Guidance FAQs Regarding the Paid Family Leave Federal Tax Credit

This week, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued FAQ guidance regarding the employer tax credit for paid family and medical leave. As a reminder, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (the Act) provides a tax credit to employers that voluntarily offer paid family and/or medical leave to employees. The FAQs clarify some of the requirements in Section 45S of the Act that an employer’s paid family and/or medical leave policy must include. The FAQs also clarify other details, such as the basis for the credit and the tax credit’s impact on an employer’s deduction for wages paid to an employee who is on a qualifying leave.

Financial Conflict of Interest in the Eighth Circuit: Trigger of a Less Deferential Standard of Review or Mere Factor in Determining Plan Administrator Abuse of Discretion?

It is well-established under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (“ERISA”) that when an employee benefit plan grants the plan administrator discretion to decide questions of eligibility for benefits or to construe plan terms, judicial review of the plan administrator’s denial of benefits is generally limited to the deferential abuse of discretion standard — pursuant to which a plan administrator’s decision is affirmed if it is reasonable, i.e., a reasonable person could have reached a similar decision given the evidence. Earlier this year, the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit, in Boyd v. ConAgra Foods, Inc., 879 F.3d 314 (8th Cir. 2018), clarified when a less deferential standard of review might nonetheless apply in the review of denial of plan benefits under ERISA Section 502(a)(1)(B).

Employee Benefits and the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

As we move into the second quarter of 2018, now is a good time to remind employers about the significant impact of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) on employee benefits. While some of these issues may not affect the taxation of employee benefits directly, the new tax treatment of certain employer-provided benefits may limit the provision of those benefits. Like any change in law, the new legislation has brought with it a number of questions.

Employee Benefits Newsletter – Spring 2018

View from Jackson Lewis: The Curious Odyssey of the Multiemployer Defined Benefit Pension Fund. A review of the state of multiemployer funds.

Multiemployer Pension Plans: Potential Successor Liability from Buyer’s Attempts to Continue Seller’s Business

The district court erred in finding a multiemployer pension plan did not show sufficient continuity of business operations to support imposing successor liability on an asset purchaser, the federal appeals court in Chicago has ruled in a case under the Multiemployer Pension Plan Amendments Act (MPPAA) involving withdrawal liability of $661,978. Indiana Electrical Workers Pension Benefit Fund v. ManWeb Services, Inc., No. 16-2840 (7th Cir. Mar. 12, 2018).