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Spokeo Strikes Again – Biometric Data Privacy Class Action Fails On Its Face (Scan)

On November 21, 2017, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit held that a plaintiff bringing a putative class action under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (“BIPA”) could not establish an injury-in-fact and therefore lacked Article III standing, further adding to the legacy of the U.S. Supreme Court’s holding in Spokeo v. Robins and providing companies with additional firepower to fight against claims of bare procedural statutory violations of privacy statutes where individuals suffer no actual harm or risk of real harm.

11th Circuit Allows Intervenors in Buccaneers Class Action Lawsuit

The Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals recently considered two class action lawsuits under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA), which involved the same class and allegations and the question of whether additional parties could intervene in a pending case. In Technology Training Associates, Inc., et al. v. Buccaneers Limited Partnership, Cin-Q Automobiles, Inc. filed a complaint on behalf of a putative class, alleging that Buccaneers Limited Partnership was responsible for unsolicited faxes that violated the TCPA.

Class Action Trends Report Fall 2017

Our quarterly report discusses new developments in class action litigation and offers strategic guidance and tactical tips on how to defend such claims.

Compensation Policies Under Scrutiny: Federal Court Conditionally Certifies Class of Female Faculty Physicians in EPA Case

On September 28, 2017, the U.S. District Court for the Central District of Illinois granted conditional collective action certification in Ahad v. Board of Trustees of Southern Illinois University, a case under the Equal Pay Act (EPA) brought on behalf of female faculty physician employees of the Southern Illinois University School of Medicine and SIU Physicians & Surgeons, Inc.

Step Right Up: Tentative Ruling Shows Amusement Park Beats Back Bulk of Class Bid

In a mixed ruling, a California state court judge in Villegas v. Six Flags Entertainment Corp., Case No. BC505344, issued a decision last week denying certification of eight subclasses of amusement park workers, but indicating she would consider certification of several others pending further briefing.

eLABORate: Fifth Circuit Holds Employees Do Not Have a Right to Class Actions Under the NLRA

In two recent rulings, the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit held that Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) “does not confer a substantive right to participate in class or collective action litigation.” Class or collective actions allow large groups of employees to collectively pursue similar employment-related lawsuits in court. Such actions are popular with the plaintiffs’ bar, and dreaded by employers because of the increased defense costs and potential liability from such litigation.

Arbitrator Must Rule on Independent Contractor Status of Uber Drivers in Class-Action Notwithstanding NLRA Bar to Class Action Waivers

Last week, a U.S. District Court Judge in Illinois ruled that an arbitration agreement signed by an Uber driver required arbitration on the issue of whether Uber drivers are employees or independent contractors before the driver could proceed with a wage and hour class action lawsuit against Uber. The Court’s decision raises an important exception to current law in the Seventh Circuit, holding that class action waivers in arbitration agreements with employees are invalid and unenforceable under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).

Certification of Alleged Misclassified Bakery Distributors Denied due to Predominance of Individualized Issues

Class certification would have been granted in Soares v. Flowers Foods, Inc., 3:15-cv-04918 (N.D. Cal., June 28, 2017), but for the allegedly misclassified independent contractors’ decision to deliver, or not deliver, the goods themselves.

New Supreme Court Term to Kick Off With Argument in Class Action Waiver Cases

On July 19, 2017, the Supreme Court of the United States released the October 2017 term’s calendar for oral arguments, including the date it will hear oral argument in the three consolidated class action waiver cases that are currently before the Court. The term will start on October 2, 2017, with the justices hearing a total of one hour of oral argument in National Labor Relations Board v. Murphy Oil USA, Inc., Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis, and Ernst & Young LLP v. Morris.

Murphy Oil Case Scheduled for Oral Argument

In January, the United States Supreme Court granted certiorari in National Labor Relations Board v. Murphy Oil USA, Case No. 16-307, Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis, Case No. 16-285 and Ernst & Young LLP v. Morris, Case No. 16-300, consolidating them for argument.