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Active Shooter Situations: What Employers Can Do Before It’s Too Late

While last month’s massacre at Orlando’s Pulse nightclub shook the nation to its core, active shooter situations have become all too common in recent years. As also shown by the San Bernardino office holiday party rampage and other examples, this is an issue HR simply cannot afford to ignore.

Taking Workplace Training to the Next Level: EEOC Task Force Recommends Live, Interactive Harassment Prevention Training

On June 20, 2016, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission released a 130-page report (“the Report”)1 on harassment in the workplace. The Report contains 45 specific recommendations and identifies 12 “risk factors” concerning workplace harassment and its prevention. Notably, the Report devoted the bulk of its recommendations to the need for effective compliance training and related efforts.

Some Thoughts from the Feds on the Gig Economy

In recent months, the gig economy has increasingly been the subject of articles, blog posts, studies, and podcasts. In June, not wanting to miss the party, the U.S. Department of Commerce contributed a twenty-seven page paper on the subject, coining the new name “digital matching firms.”

Wait – Senator Warren DIDN’T Slam The Gig Economy?

Outspoken Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren isn’t known for mincing words. Whether she’s telling a big bank to “go to hell” from the floor of the Congress or calling Donald Trump a cancerous demagogue, she is anything but cagey or demure. Apparently, the feeling is mutual. Time suggested recently that “hardly any other legislator inspires the kind of vituperation that Warren does in her opponents.”

"Brexit": What American Employers Need to Know

Following the United Kingdom's stunning decision last week to leave the European Union, many US employers with employees in the UK find themselves wondering: What happens now? To be sure, "Brexit" was a monumental and astonishing result, which caught the world by surprise. We're here to explain what American employers need to know for the coming weeks, months, and years.

Keep Calm and Carry On!

With the Brexit vote accomplished and the future of the UK in question, many employers with operations in the UK or the EU are questioning the application of existing privacy laws to their employees or subsidiaries there. For the meantime—at least according to the current U.K. Information Commissioner’s Office, the UK is treating privacy under its status quo rules: “The Data Protection Act remains the law of the land irrespective of the referendum result.” And even if the UK ultimately determines not to comply with the GDPR as a member of the EU, if it wants to trade with the EU, it will have to show that its privacy practices are “adequate”.

What Does Brexit Mean For International Employers?

On June 23, 2016, in a hotly contested referendum, British voters chose to leave the European Union in a contest dubbed “Brexit” (for “British exit”). It will take some time before the full implications of this decision become apparent to employers with operations in the UK.

Understanding Singapore’s Employment Act and Its Recent Amendments

As of April 1, 2016, the Singapore Ministry of Manpower is enforcing amendments to its Employment Act (EA), which was originally enacted in 1968 and revised in 2009. The amendments involve enhanced requirements for pay stubs, how to present employees with key employment terms in writing, and recordkeeping.

New Agreement on Privacy Shield Set to Become Final in Early July

On June 24, 2016, the European Commission announced that it had reached a final agreement with the United States on the terms of the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield, which will permit U.S. companies to transfer the personal data of European Union (EU) citizens to the United States in compliance with EU data protection laws. The terms of the final agreement address several concerns raised by EU regulators about the initial Privacy Shield agreement reached in February of 2016, including concerns about the U.S. government’s ability to conduct mass surveillance of transferred data, the independence of the U.S. ombudsperson who will adjudicate complaints from EU citizens regarding misuse of their data, and the lack of protections regarding data retention and transfers to other companies.

EU, U.S. Agree On Revisions To Privacy Shield

According to reports, the European Union and the United States have agreed on changes to the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield (Privacy Shield) which will be sent to the EU member states and the college of the 28 EU commissioners ultimately paving the way for final approval early next month. “We have agreed on the changes and will be able to adopt it in early July,” said European Commission spokesman Christian Wigand.
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