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Total Articles: 17

WPI Wage Watch: Minimum Wage and Overtime Updates (November Edition)

The leftovers are (mostly) gone, and turkey-induced naps have been taken, but if you think a post-Thanksgiving minimum wage and overtime update will be uneventful, you are mistaken. Jurisdictions continue to announce 2018 minimum wage rates,1 cities have amended existing or introduced new minimum wage ordinances, state legislators have pre-filed 2018 bills, and a lawsuit challenging a forthcoming local law has been filed.

2018 Minimum Wage Rate Increases: Are You Ready?

The federal minimum wage has remained stagnant at $7.25 an hour since 2009. In the absence of an increase to the federal minimum wage, an increasing number of states, cities, and other municipalities have enacted statutes providing for minimum wage rates in excess of (and, in some cases, more than twice as high as) the federal rate.

Minimum Wage Hikes Headline Flurry of July 1 Compliance Dates

July 1 is a day of national celebration for our friends in Canada. But in many parts of the US, it’s compliance deadline day as a flurry of new employment laws take effect. Here are some of most significant changes employers need to know about before the clock strikes 12:00 on Friday night.

WPI Wage Watch: Minimum Wage and Overtime Updates (May Edition)

Just under halfway through 2017, minimum wage and overtime developments have shifted into overdrive. Proposals submitted by federal legislators from both sides of the aisle highlight the different approaches the country’s main political parties take to tackling labor and employment issues. States and counties struggle to assert their legislative dominance over their governmental subordinates. And local councils and agencies continue to push existing and proposed minimum wage ordinances.

WPI Wage Watch: Minimum Wage & Overtime Updates (January Edition)

Since we published our annual article discussing minimum wage rates in 2017,1 many state and local jurisdictions have adjusted their minimum wage rates, state legislative sessions have begun, signatures have been collected for ballot measures, and officials have hinted at policies they intend to pursue. One particularly interesting development we have seen is the emergence of several anti-preemption bills, or bills designed to upend the trend in recent years of state laws preempting the development of local minimum wage rates that would exceed the state or federal minimum wage rates.

2017 State Minimum-Wage Increases

As employers wait to see whether, when, and to what extent the federal Fair Labor Standards Act's minimum wage might increase in the near future, many other jurisdictions have continued to raise their rates to levels higher than the FLSA's current $7.25 an hour. Of course, covered employers must ensure that they are paying not less than the FLSA minimum or any higher required rate(s) applying to their non-exempt workers.

Employers Prepare for Patchwork of Minimum Wage Rates for 2017

With the federal minimum wage stalled at $7.25 an hour since 2009, states, counties, and local governments have increasingly stepped in and passed legislation raising the minimum wage above the federal level. Because federal law does not prevent other jurisdictions from passing laws that are more protective of employees (the federal law establishes only a floor), the higher minimum wage rate in the employer’s jurisdiction applies.

The Rising Minimum Wages and Tip Credits for 2017: An Overview

Effective January 1, 2017, 29 states plus the District of Columbia will have minimum wage rates that are above the federal minimum wage rate of $7.25 per hour. The District of Columbia will continue to have, as it did last year, one of the highest minimum wage rates in the country at $11.50 per hour until July 1, 2017, and $12.50 per hour after that date. With respect to state minimum wages, Massachusetts and Washington will have the highest minimum wages at $11.00 per hour effective January 1, 2017, with California close behind at $10.50 per hour (for employers with 26 or more employees), effective January 1, 2017, and Connecticut following at $10.10 per hour, effective January 1, 2017.

Employer Alert: Many State Minimum Wages to Increase in 2017

In 2016, 17 states and the District of Columbia implemented increased minimum wage rates. This year, even more states are scheduled to do so.

Minimum Wage Increases In Store For Many In 2017

While the federal minimum wage has remained steady at $7.25 for the past seven years, many state and local jurisdictions have set their own minimum rates higher than the federal level. And, of course, when a local jurisdiction mandates a rate higher than the federal rate, you must pay your employees the higher rate.

Voters Approve Minimum Wage Hikes in Arizona, Colorado, Maine and Washington

On Election Day, voters in Arizona, Colorado, Maine and Washington approved ballot initiatives to increase the minimum wage.

Local Minimum Wage Enforcement Varies: Millions in Fines in One City, Nothing in Another

Nearly three dozen cities and counties around the nation have enacted local minimum wage ordinances in recent years - but statistics collected by XpertHR suggest that these ordinances are not being enforced consistently.

Minimum Wage Set to Increase in NY, NJ, and CT

Employers with employees in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut should expect more than just holiday cheer this New Year. Increases in those state’s minimum wages may also bring about increased costs for businesses and organizations that utilize low-wage earners.

Minimum Wage Soars in Airport Town – The First Domino Falls

Voters in Sea-Tac, Washington, an airport town between Seattle and Tacoma, narrowly approved a measure to increase the minimum wage to $15 and provide paid sick time to certain hospitality and transportation workers associated with the airport and tourism. The ordinance also ties future minimum wage increases to inflation. While the ordinance currently faces court challenges that could bar its implementation, if the ordinance goes into effect, Sea-Tac will be the guinea pig allowing the rest of the nation to see the effects of a $15 minimum wage, the highest in the country.

Nassar's "But For" Requirement Breaks the Chain for Retaliation Plaintiffs Relying on Temporal Proximity to Establish Causation

In a decision in favor of the University of Pennsylvania entered on August 7, 2013, the Third Circuit Court of Appeals reviewed the “but for” standard for liability under University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center v. Nassar and provided a roadmap for employers accused of retaliation to defeat the inference of causation that can arise from temporal proximity between protected activity and adverse employment action. To establish a prima facie case of retaliation under § 704(a) of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, a plaintiff must demonstrate that (1) he or she engaged in activity protected by Title VII; (2) he or she suffered an adverse employment action after or contemporaneously with the protected conduct; and (3) there was a causal connection between participation in the protected activity and the adverse employment action.

Minimum Wage Increases in 2013

With the New Year comes a minimum wage increase in 10 states: Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Missouri, Montana, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont and Washington. Each of these states has a higher minimum wage rate than the federal minimum of $7.25/hour. Employers in these states are required to pay the higher state minimum wage.

Minimum Wage Increases For Oregon And Washington Starting January 1, 2013

On January 1, 2013, the minimum wage for employees working in Washington will increase to $9.19 per hour. On the same day, the minimum wage for employees working in Oregon will rise to $8.95 per hour. With these increases, Washington and Oregon will remain the states with the two highest minimum wage rates in the entire country. What do employers need to know about this change, aside from increasing their payroll accordingly?
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