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Total Articles: 10

Is Comp Time on its Way? The Working Families Flexibility Act Passes the House

On May 2, 2017, the U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 1180, the Working Families Flexibility Act of 2017. Commonly referred to as the “comp time” bill, H.R. 1180 would amend the Fair Labor Standards Act to allow employees to choose paid time off or “comp time” instead of cash wages as compensation for working overtime hours. Among other provisions, the bill sets forth parameters on how much paid time off employees can accrue and how and when employees can cash out their banked time as cash wages.

Bill Allowing Private Employers to Offer Comp Time Approved by House, Heads to Senate

Private-sector employers soon may be able to grant compensatory time in lieu of overtime pay to employees.

Private-Sector Comp Time Bill Passes House

The US House of Representatives has passed a bill that would amend the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) to allow private-sector employers to offer compensatory time off instead of cash for overtime hours.

Temporary "Comp Time" Provision Under Consideration

The U.S. House of Representatives is now actively considering the "Working Families Flexibility Act of 2017" (H.R. 1180), which would amend the federal Fair Labor Standards Act to permit private-sector employers to offer compensatory time off in lieu of monetary overtime compensation. It is essentially the same as a measure that passed the House in 2013.

Can Employers Offer Compensatory Time to Exempt Employees? [Wage & Hour FAQ]

Recently, two blog readers asked a question about the use of compensatory (comp) time in the private sector during a discussion about tracking exempt employees’ hours worked. One reader’s company tracked exempt employees’ hours worked, and permitted the employees to “flex” any hours worked in excess of a normal workweek, either later that week or in future weeks on an hour-for-hour basis, subject to work loads and scheduling requirements.

You Choose: Time Or Money?

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, almost 60% of American workers are paid an hourly wage. Many of these workers are employed by companies who offer little in the way of paid time off such as sick time, vacation time, or family leave. While most workers in the United States are protected by various laws which guarantee unpaid time off in certain circumstances, relatively few are entitled to paid time off unless the employer simply chooses to make paid time off available.

"Comp Time" Might Be Moving Up On The Agenda

We reported in April and May about the fast-tracked "Working Families Flexibility Act of 2013" passed in the U.S. House of Representatives. This measure proposes to amend the federal Fair Labor Standards Act to permit private-sector employers to offer compensatory time off in lieu of monetary overtime compensation.

Comp Time: Who Benefits Most?

Since early May, when the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Working Families Flexibility Act of 2013 (also called the “comp time” bill) by a narrow margin, many articles and blogs have opined on whether the proposed legislation would actually benefit employees by providing time off instead of overtime pay. Like many other types of employment-related legislation and existing laws, it depends.

Free To Choose: Time Or Money

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 59 percent of American workers are paid an hourly wage. Many of these workers are employed by companies that offer little in the way of paid time off such as sick time, vacation or family leave. While most workers in the United States are protected by various laws that guarantee unpaid time off in certain circumstances, relatively few are entitled to paid time off unless the employer simply chooses to make it available.

"Comp Time" Proposal: Be Careful What You Wish For

The U.S. House of Representatives will consider amending the federal Fair Labor Standards Act to permit private-sector employers to offer compensatory time off in lieu of monetary overtime compensation. The fast-tracked "Working Families Flexibility Act of 2013" (H.R. 1406) was approved by a House committee only eight days after its introduction.
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