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Total Articles: 6

How Disruptive Can an Aggressive NLRB Be in a Non-Union Setting? More Than You Might Think

If you are a non-union employer (and overwhelmingly most employers are) you might not have given much thought to your how your confidentiality policy stacked up against the National Labor Relations Act. In fact your policy might read something like the following:

Talking Money at Work

Today's Wall Street Journal discusses workers willingness to talk with their peers about what they are being paid as a generational change. Workers Share Their Salary Secrets. But as the article notes, in the past many employers prohibited such talk.

Is Your Employment-At-Will Policy Legal?

The National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) continues its invasion of union-free workplaces. Its next target is employee handbook provisions confirming the employment relationship is “at will,” meaning it can be terminated unilaterally by either the employer or the employee for any lawful reason.

The NLRB in the Non-Union Setting: Making A Point

For years I have been a member of seminar planning committees, and inevitably the talk gets round to an NLRA topic. In Texas, that usually meets groans and comments to the effect that no one is really interested because very few practitioners actually deal with union related matters.

Wash His Mouth Out With Soap!

The National Labor Relations Board under the Obama Administration has been in the news quite a bit lately. It has repeatedly been accused of ignoring past legal precedent in order to favor employees and unions over employers. While the agency has always been one of the most politicized in the federal government, it seems to have really outdone itself in a recent case involving a dealer. You be the judge.

The NLRB Takes Its Internet Battle to a Non-Unionized Workplace

On May 9, 2011, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued a complaint alleging that Hispanics United, a Buffalo non-profit that provides social services to low-income clients, violated the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) when it fired five employees after they used Facebook to criticize working conditions. This complaint comes on the heels of two other highly publicized situations in which the NLRB asserted that companies violated employees’ rights by limiting the information that could be posted on social media sites.
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