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Total Articles: 4

Single Racial Slur Enough for Hostile Work Environment, Says 3rd Circuit

A supervisor's single use of the "n-word" is sufficiently severe to support a hostile work environment, racial harassment lawsuit, a federal appellate court has ruled. In Castlebury v. STI Group, the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals explained that the proper standard to apply in hostile environment cases is whether discrimination is severe or pervasive, rather than pervasive and regular.

Can a single use of a racial slur constitute illegal discrimination? One court says . . . maybe.

After being sued for race discrimination, an employer/company filed a motion to dismiss the claims against it, arguing that a single use of the n-word was not sufficient to state a claim for hostile work environment.

Evidence of "color bias" may lead to jury trial under Title VII.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits employment discrimination against an individual because of that person’s "race, color, religion, sex, or national origin." While courts routinely address claims of race discrimination, claims of discrimination on the basis of color alone are far less frequently reviewed.

Fired Employee Who Accused Coworkers of Sleeping with Boyfriend Lacks Triable Bias Claim

A retail employer did not violate federal civil rights laws or the Massachusetts state anti-discrimination law when it fired an employee because she made harassing, disparaging, and inappropriate accusations against her coworkers. According to the First Circuit Court of Appeals the discharged employee, who accused her coworkers of sleeping with her boyfriend—an employee of the same retail employer—failed to present evidence that her termination was motivated by race discrimination. She also failed to show, the court found, that the company’s later failure to rehire her was connected to her earlier discrimination complaint. Pina v. The Children’s Place, No. 13-1609, First Circuit Court of Appeals (January 27, 2014).
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