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Total Articles: 6

Kansas City Verdict - Another Successful "Reverse Discrimination" Claim

Earlier this month I commented that one trend we might see this year was more "reverse discrimination" claims. See, 2011 -- the Year of the Non-minority? The outcome of a suit in a Kansas City courtroom yesterday does not prove me right, but it certainly does nothing to prove me wrong.

2011 --- the Year of the Non-minority?

Predicting what a new year will bring is a time honored tradition, but much like resolutions, most predictions rarely last longer than the first flip of the calendar. So rather than a long list, let me just start with one thing that I am guessing we might see, more cases where what might be thought to be "non-minority" employees are claiming that they have been treated differently because of their race.

High Court Issues Ruling In Reverse Bias Case.

On June 29, the U.S. Supreme Court held, in a 5-4 ruling, that the City of New Haven's decision to discard test results that were used to identify those firefighters best qualified for promotion violated Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. Justice Anthony Kennedy, writing for the majority, ruled that the City's race-based rejection of the test results cannot satisfy the "strong-basis-in-evidence standard," which the Court adopted to resolve conflicts between Title VII's disparate treatment and disparate impact provisions. According to the Court, "[f]ear of litigation alone cannot justify an employer's reliance on race to the detriment of individuals who passed the examinations and qualified for promotions."

Supreme Court Rules In Favor Of Firefighters In Reverse Discrimination Case.

In one of the most important employment law cases of the decade, the U.S. Supreme Court handed employees a 5-4 victory by recognizing that even good-faith employment decisions can sometimes lead to results that give rise to lawsuits if those results fall more harshly on one class of employees than on another.

Supreme Court Issues Ruling In Firefighter “Reverse” Discrimination Case.

On June 29, the U.S. Supreme Court held, in a 5-4 decision, that the City of New Haven’s action in discarding test results that were used to identify those firefighters best qualified for promotion violated Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. Justice Anthony Kennedy, writing for the majority, ruled that the City’s race-based rejection of the test results cannot satisfy the strong-basis-in-evidence standard, which the Court adopted to resolve any conflict between Title VII’s disparate treatment and disparate impact provisions. According to the Court, “[f]ear of litigation alone cannot justify an employer’s reliance on race to the detriment of individuals who passed the examinations and qualified for promotions.”

Court Rejects Reverse Discrimination Claims Based on Speculative Evidence.

Plaintiff was employed by Rowan University as an administrative assistant for approximately five years but was transferred to a different department after she received successive unsatisfactory performance evaluations under a new Dean. Plaintiff was eventually terminated. Several months prior to the end of Plaintiff's tenure at the University, a Hispanic woman was hired for the administrative assistant position that Plaintiff previously held. Thereafter, Plaintiff filed several discrimination claims (including an allegation of reverse racial discrimination).