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Total Articles: 12

OSHA Brings Sharper Focus to Battling Occupational Lung Disease

Construction workers, coal miners, foundry workers, and stone cutters inhale tiny bits of dust on a daily basis. The dust penetrates their lungs and over time their lungs scar over. This results in a broad range of health issues, including silicosis, pneumoconiosis (black lung), chronic beryllium disease and lung cancer. It may be decades before the effects of the dust inhalation are felt, but the U.S. Department of Labor is working to change that.

A Flu Update: Proactive Employer Preparations in Advance of a Potential Pandemic.

Government health officials predict millions of Americans will contract the novel H1N1 flu virus, commonly called the Swine Flu. No business will be immune from the effects of this virus. Employers should prepare for the impact of a pandemic on the workplace with a sense of urgency. Proper planning for this serious employment challenge will be essential to protect the health of employees while avoiding disruption of operations.

FAQs About Swine Flu in the Workplace.

A year ago at this time, it seemed that every other phone call or e-mail I received from a client was a question about layoffs and downsizing. This fall, the main questions coming my way have been about swine flu (also known as H1N1). Following are answers to the most common questions I've been asked.

Preparing for Pandemic Influenza: Re-Thinking Employee Health & Wellness Before a Crisis Affects Your Workplace

An influenza pandemic could have a major effect on the economy and all areas of commerce and employment. Business planning for pandemic influenza is essential to minimize a pandemic's impact. In the event of an influenza pandemic, employers will play a critical role in protecting employees' health, safety, and overall well-being.

If A Pandemic Strikes...

With the advent of the H1N1 flu, businesses are preparing for the worst, and hospitals are not exempt from this preparation. While other employers will practice "social distancing," or keeping away from other people's germs, hospitals will be treating the worst H1N1 cases, exposing employees to the virus. Hospitals must have a continuity plan in place so that the facility can operate as normal. Pandemics can create staff shortages due to absences of sick employees and employees taking time off to care for sick family members. Suppliers may be short staffed too, and deliveries of products may be interrupted.

Swine Flu Threat Good For Unions?

Using scare tactics to drum up fear has long been used by unions to generate unhappy employees, and to provide a good environment for unionization. Some unions are now using the H1N1 virus, or swine flu, to create controversy, rather than unifying and assisting hospitals and other industry employers in preparing for a possible pandemic. Finding a topic to exploit with workers is nothing new, and using a topic that scares many and can create a panic is just icing on the cake.

Pandemic Planning - Are You Prepared For This Year's Flu Season?

The H1N1 virus, commonly known as the swine flu, has grabbed headlines and worried millions. The federal government has taken an active role in helping to educate the public regarding prevention and containment of the flu. Most employers have felt the impact of H1N1, and even more are wondering the extent to which their operations will be affected as we approach the heart of the flu season. As a result, employers are preparing pandemic flu plans and taking precautions to prevent the spread of the H1N1 virus.

H1N1 Q&A (pdf).

26 questions and answers about H1N1 and workplace law.

A Flu Update: Proactive Employer Preparations in Advance of a Potential Pandemic.

Government health officials predict millions of Americans will contract the novel H1N1 flu virus, commonly called the Swine Flu. No business will be immune from the effects of this virus. Employers should prepare for the impact of a pandemic on the workplace with a sense of urgency. Proper planning for this serious employment challenge will be essential to protect the health of employees while avoiding disruption of operations.

The Swine Flu Outbreak: Questions Answered, Practical Prevention Advice, And Planning If The Situation Gets Worse.

With the media focusing on the increasing number of swine flu cases reported in the United States, Mexico, and elsewhere, employers need to be prepared to address their employees’ concerns.

Pandemic Planning: Are You Prepared?

After dealing with the economic downturn and the new FMLA regulations, amended ADA obligations, and new COBRA requirements, HR and legal professionals now move on (or perhaps return) to pandemic planning. The media attention and public interest are intense, especially after the World Health Organization (WHO) raised the level of influenza pandemic alert from phase 4 to phase 5. As WHO Director-General Dr. Margaret Chan said, "[C]ertain actions should now be undertaken with increased urgency, and at an accelerated pace."

Practical Pandemic Preparation.

Health experts have long warned that the question is not whether we will have a pandemic, but when one will strike. Now, world governments and health organizations are closely monitoring outbreaks of swine flu that have reportedly killed more than 150 people and sickened more than 1,600 across Mexico. As of April 29, confirmed U.S. cases of Swine Influenza A (H1N1) reportedly numbered over 60 in California, Kansas, Indiana, New York City, Ohio, and Texas which includes one death.
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