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Total Articles: 70

eLABORate: OSHA Extends Injury Reporting Deadline Until December 15, 2017

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) has announced a two-week delay of the deadline for employers to submit their 2016 “Summary of Work Related Injuries and Illnesses.” The deadline previously was December 1, 2017, but has been extended until December 15, 2017. The requirement to submit this data is a result of a new rule issued during the Obama administration and will be a first for employers.

OSHA Still Considering Revising Electronic Recordkeeping Rule

With the December 1, 2017 deadline fast approaching for covered employers to electronically submit injury and illness records to OSHA, the Agency has indicated that it is close to completing its review to the Obama-era Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses final rule. In a Status Report filed on October 10, 2017 with U.S. District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma which has stayed litigation over the rule pending further rulemaking, the Department of Justice (“DOJ”) indicated that OSHA continues to develop a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (“NPRM”) to “reconsider, revise, or remove provisions of the [Rule]” as announced in the July 20, 2017 Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs’ regulatory agenda.

OSHA Delays Online Record-Keeping Rule and Opens Proposal for Comment

On June 27, 2017, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) proposed to delay the compliance date of the Obama-era regulation requiring electronic submission of injury and illness records and online public access to such records. OSHA recently announced that it would propose delaying the July 1 deadline for employers with establishments of 25 or more employees to submit Form 300A electronically.

eLABORate: OSHA Proposes Delay of July 1, 2017 Deadline for Employer Compliance with Electronic Reporting of Worker Illness and Injury Records

As previously discussed in a 2016 eLABORate, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) finalized a rule requiring certain employers to submit annual illness and injury summaries electronically.

OSHA Delays Electronic Recordkeeping Compliance Date

Last week, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration announced that it intends to delay for an unknown period of time the initial compliance deadline for electronic submission of injury and illness recordkeeping forms.

OSHA Announces Delay To Electronic Recordkeeping Rule

Employers will be relieved, at least temporarily, of the requirement to file injury information through an electronic recordkeeping system that was scheduled to take effect this July 1. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), which had issued a rule requiring the posting of such information for most employers in May 2016, announced yesterday that the filing deadline will be postponed for an undetermined period of time.

OSHA Delays Deadline for Electronic Submission of Injury and Illness Logs

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has announced that it will extend the July 1, 2017 deadline for electronic submission of employers’ injury and illness logs.

OSHA to Extend Electronic Recordkeeping Compliance Date

In an email sent today to stakeholders, OSHA announced that it intends to delay the July 1, 2017 compliance date for the electronic submission of the 2016 Form 300A. As part of the final rule, Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses issued in May 2016, employers had a phased in compliance deadline for the electronic submission of recordkeeping forms. For 2017, employers with establishments with 250 or more employees and establishments with less than 250 employees but 20 or more in certain high-risk industries were required to electronically submit their 2016 Form 300A by July 1, 2017. However, the secure website that OSHA intended to use for the submission of these recordkeeping forms has not been made available.

EHS on Tap – Update on OSHA’s Electronic Recordkeeping Rule

I recently had the chance to participate in a podcast for BLR’s EHS on Tap…listen in as we discuss the status of OSHA’s Electronic Recordkeeping rule.

OSHA Reminds Employers to Post Injury and Illness Summaries

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has reminded employers they must post a copy of the agency’s “Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses” (Form 300A) summarizing job-related injuries and illnesses logged during 2016.

Proposed Midnight Rules Relief Act May Put An End To OSHA Recordkeeping Rule

Earlier this year, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to approve the Midnight Rules Relief Act by a vote of 238-184. This Republican-backed measure would amend the Congressional Review Act and allow Congress to overturn, en masse, any federal regulation enacted during the final year of a president’s term. If approved by the Senate and signed into law, the Act could have broad implications for any regulation passed in 2016, including, among many other workplace law regulations, the recordkeeping rule issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and its related anti-retaliation provisions.

Is OSHA Backpedaling On the New Electronic Reporting of Workplace Injury and Illness Data?

We’re all scrambling for any hint of impending OSHA changes, but are limited largely to speculation because we do not yet have a new Secretary of Labor or an Assistant Secretary of Labor for OSHA. Career OSHA management at the DC, Regional and Area Office level simply advise that “it’s business as usual.”

OSHA Recordkeeping Rule Starts White House Review

The White House is reviewing a proposed worker safety rule from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration that aims to expand the requirement on how long employers must maintain accurate records of worker injuries and illnesses.

Final Rule Overturning AKM-Volks Recordkeeping Decision Expected Soon

In 2012, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia held that OSHA could not issue citations for failing to record an injury or illness beyond the six-month statute of limitations set out in the statute. AKM LLC d/b/a Volks Constructors v. Sec’y of Labor, 675 F.3d 752 (D.C. Cir. 2012).

Possible Further Extension on Anti-Retaliation Provisions (Incentive & Drug Testing Policies)

Last week a federal judge requested that OSHA agree to further extend the November 1st effective date for the anti-retaliation provisions in OSHA’s “Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses” also known as the Electronic Recordkeeping rule.

OSHA’s New Reporting Rules Raise New Concerns for Employers

Ever since the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) released new reporting and recordkeeping rules, employers have been struggling to determine what they actually mean for their workplaces. Whether it is the various reporting requirements or the multiple effective dates, OSHA’s new rules are resulting in confusion and alarm among employers who seek to simply understand how the rules affect their everyday policies and procedures.

Electronic Recordkeeping Rule – OSHA Delays Effective Date for Anti-Retaliation Provision

Yesterday, OSHA announced that it would delay the effective date of one portion of the final rule, “Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses” also known as the Electronic Recordkeeping rule. Specifically, OSHA has delayed enforcement of the anti-retaliation provision, 1904.35(b)(1)(iv), from August 10, 2016 until November 1, 2016. Section 1904.35(b)(1)(iv), states, “[employers] must not discharge or in any manner discriminate against any employee for reporting a work-related injury or illness.”

What OSHA’s New Reporting Rules Mean for Employers

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently finalized rules on the electronic reporting of workplace injuries and illnesses. OSHA’s new reporting rules place significant burdens on employers that bring the potential for substantial economic liability and serious frustration.

Compliance Date Nears for OSHA’s New Recordkeeping Anti-Retaliation Rule

Employers must ensure they are in compliance with the anti-retaliation provisions of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s new electronic recordkeeping and reporting rule by August 10, 2016. The rest of the new regulation requiring certain employers to submit injury and illness data electronically to OSHA becomes effective on January 1, 2017.

Alcohol-Related Workplace Injuries Recordable, OSHA Says

Employers are not exempt from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s reporting rule for on-the-job injuries linked to alcohol intoxication even though the injured employee’s consumption of alcoholic beverages took place off the job.

Alcohol-Related Workplace Injuries Recordable, OSHA Says

Employers are not exempt from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s reporting rule for on-the-job injuries linked to alcohol intoxication even though the injured employee’s consumption of alcoholic beverages took place off the job.

OSHA’s Big Pivot: How the New Electronic Recordkeeping Rule Impacts Injury Reporting, Prevention and Drug Testing Programs

OSHA’s long-awaited Final Rule on Electronic Recordkeeping is out and employers need to prepare for some significant new changes. During this webinar, our presenters will break down the rule to identify steps your company can take now to ensure compliance by the Rule’s most immediate effective date on August 10, 2016. Topics to be covered include:

OSHA Changes to Recordkeeping Rules Will Make Injury and Illness Data Public; Restricts Post-Incident Drug Testing and Safety Incentive Programs

Claiming that it will “nudge” employers to focus on safety, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued a final rule which updates the way it collects, and employers report, workplace injury and illness data. The new rule, which takes effect January 1, 2017, requires covered employers with 250 or more employees and employers in “high risk” industries with 20 or more employees to electronically submit injury and illness data to OSHA. Employers must count part-time, seasonal and temporary employees in determining whether they have the threshold number of employees. OSHA will post the injury and illness information on its website, although it states it will remove any personally identifiable information before posting.

New OSHA Rule Requires Companies to Make Records Public

It used to be that OSHA primarily had access to a company's OSHA logs when requested as part of an investigation. As such, OSHA, and the public, had little to no information about worker injuries and illnesses. All of that has changed now with OSHA’s new disclosure rule.

eLABORate: OSHA Issues Changes to Recordkeeping Regulations

Employers who are already required to keep a log of OSHA recordable incidents should revisit their handbooks, safety policies and safety incentive programs. The newest recordkeeping rule, finalized by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration on Wednesday, May 11, 2016, likely will require changes to these items, and implementation is just a few months away.

OSHA’s New Electronic Accident Reporting Rule Seeks to Dramatically Impair Post-Accident Drug and Alcohol Testing

Many thousands of employers implement post-accident drug and alcohol testing policies to promote workplace safety, as part of accident investigation efforts and in the hope of reducing workplace accidents and workers’ compensation claims. For those employers, the legal landscape may have shifted on May 12, 2016, when the Occupational Safety and Health Administration published its final rule on electronic reporting of workplace injuries and illnesses.1

OSHA’s New Reporting Rule Dabbles With Behavioral Economics to Incentivize Workplace Safety

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued a new rule that applies behavioral economics to incentivize workplace safety. The new rule requires electronic submission of workplace injury and illness reports in order to better inform workers, employers and the general public about workplace hazards. OSHA representatives remark that such a policy can be analogized to restaurant grading based on sanitation whereby restaurants must comply with kitchen cleanliness guidelines or suffer public disclosure of violations. Similarly, employers must make workplace safety a priority or face disclosure of workplace injuries and illnesses reported on the soon-to-be publicly-available OSHA database.

OSHA's Final Rule on Electronic Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses

In keeping with Assistant Secretary of Labor Dr. David Michaels’ promise to “shame” employers into compliance, on May 12, 2016, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) published its final rule on electronic reporting of workplace injuries and illnesses.1 Under this rule, OSHA will be publishing employer injury and illness records on the internet without any explanation of the facts and circumstances of the particular cases involved. Further, OSHA has changed the requirements for directing employees on reporting injuries and illnesses and assumed new authority to prosecute alleged retaliation against employees for reporting injuries and illnesses. Finally, OSHA takes the position that to ensure injury and illness reporting, employers must notify employees of their rights, and the agency must be able to police any program that might discourage reporting, such as employer safety incentive programs.

OSHA Greatly Increases Workplace Injury Reporting Requirements

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a final rule on May 11, 2016 that greatly enhances injury and illness data collection from employers. The new rule will require many employers to electronically submit information about workplace injuries and illnesses to the government, and OSHA has announced it intends to post this data on its public website.

OSHA Issues New Electronic Recordkeeping Requirements and Creates a New Cause of Action for Employees

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has amended its recordkeeping regulation, 29 CFR Part 1904, to require many employers to submit OSHA 300 Logs, OSHA 301 forms, and OSHA 300A summaries to the agency electronically. The amendments, which will be published in the Federal Register on May 12, also include provisions designed to prevent employers from retaliating against employees for reporting work-related injuries or illnesses. To abate alleged violations of these provisions, OSHA may order employers to reinstate employees or pay them back pay. The changes will allow OSHA and other stakeholders—including labor unions and plaintiffs’ attorneys—to access injury and illness data and also create a new cause of action for employees who claim their employer retaliated against them for reporting a work-related injury or illness. The final regulation also raises serious questions regarding whether OSHA has the authority under the Occupational Safety and Health Act to enact these changes.

OSHA Issues Electronic Recordkeeping Final Rule

Today, a copy of OSHA’s final electronic rule, “Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses,” was made available for public inspection prior to release in the Federal Register on May 12, 2016. In November 2013, OSHA published a notice of proposed rulemaking to add electronic recordkeeping requirements that would require certain employers to electronically submit to OSHA injury and illness recordkeeping information on a quarterly and/or annual basis. Additionally, the proposed rule would establish a public searchable website where OSHA would make employers’ injury and illness records available to the general public. In August 2014, OSHA issued a supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking to include provisions that would prohibit employers from taking adverse [termination, reduction in pay, reassignment to less desirable position] action against employees for reporting injuries and illnesses.

Final Electronic Recordkeeping Rule Expected Soon

In November 2013, OSHA published a notice of proposed rulemaking, “Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses,” to add electronic recordkeeping requirements that would require certain employers to electronically submit to OSHA injury and illness recordkeeping information on a quarterly and/or annual basis. Additionally, the proposed rule would establish a public searchable website where OSHA would make employers’ injury and illness records available to the general public.

Injuries of Intoxicated or Drugged Employees Recordable

In a recent interpretation letter, an employer posed the following scenario and question to OSHA:

OSHA Report Analyzes First Year of New Reporting Requirements

In late 2014, many employers learned about the new OSHA injury and illness reporting requirements that were to go into effect as of Jan. 1, 2015. Under the new requirements, employers were required to report all work-related fatalities within 8 hours, and all in-patient hospitalizations, amputations, and losses of an eye within 24 hours of finding out about the incident. (Under the old rule, employers had the same reporting requirement for fatalities, but were only required to report in-patient hospitalizations of three or more employees.) With the reporting requirements broadened to include all in-patient hospitalizations, it was naturally expected that more work-related injuries would be reported during 2015, the first year of the new rule.

Injury and Illness Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements – Posting 300A

Reminder: IF your company is subject to OSHA’s Injury and Illness Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements, you must post “in a common area where notices to employees are usually posted” OSHA’s Form 300A (summary of job-related illnesses and injuries) for the previous year.

Employers Must Post Summaries of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses

Employers are required to post a copy of OSHA’s Form 300A between February 1, 2016 and April 30, 2016. This form summarizes the job-related injuries and illnesses employees experienced during 2015. The summary must be posted in a common area where notices to employees are usually posted each year. Information contained on the summary includes the total number of deaths, injuries, poisonings, respiratory conditions, skin disorders, instances of hearing loss, and other illnesses experienced by the employees.

Fainting is Recordable Even If Caused by Non-Recordable Event

Fainting is recordable under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s injury reporting rules, even if the loss-of-consciousness is due to a non-recordable injury incurred at work, the agency said in an interpretation letter to a West Virginia retailer.

OSHA Law Blog Live: Increased Penalties for Employers, Electronic Recordkeeping Proposed Rule Almost Final

This podcast covers two major developments in workplace safety health and law:

Passing out at the sight of blood could lead to a “recordable” OSHA event.

Under the Recordkeeping regulation of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), covered employers must prepare and maintain records of serious occupational injuries and illnesses. That regulation sets forth the injuries that must be recorded:

OSHA Proposes Changes to Recordkeeping Rule

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has proposed a rule intended to overcome a court ruling that barred the agency from citing an employer for failing to record an injury or illness beyond the six-month statute of limitations set out in the statute. The rule, proposed July 29, would amend 29 CFR § 1904 to clarify that an employer’s duty to record an injury or illness continues for a period of five years, the length of time employers now must keep records of every recordable injury or illness. The OSHA 300 Log and 301 Incident Report forms are used for this purpose.

OSHA Proposes New Rules to “Clarify” Recordkeeping Obligations

On July 29, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) published in the Federal Register a proposed rule to “clarify” employers’ recordkeeping obligations under 29 C.F.R. Part 1904. Comments are due by September 28.

OSHA's New Enforcement Procedures: What To Expect When You’re Reporting

Anticipating a surge of injury and illness reports as a result of its new reporting rules, OSHA's Directorate of Enforcement Programs issued a 20+ page memorandum late last year outlining its Interim Enforcement Procedures for New Reporting Requirements under 29 CFR 1904.39. While many employers can expect to have their hands full dealing with a host of new requests for information from OSHA, as well as an almost certain increase in the number of inspections, the memorandum provides valuable insight into the questions employers will likely be asked and the criteria the agency will consider when deciding whether to visit your facility after an accident.

Update – Enforcement of OSHA Reporting Requirements

As you know by now, as of January 1, 2015, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has new reporting requirements mandating that employers notify OSHA whenever there is: a workplace fatality; any in?patient hospitalization; an amputation; or loss of an eye. These new requirements have increased the number of reports made to OSHA, and consequently, OSHA’s workload. To address this influx of new reports, OSHA released “Interim Enforcement Procedures for New Reporting Requirements” that outlines how the local Area Offices will receive and respond to reports.

The Hazards of the Industry – New Requirements for Reporting to OSHA

Sally Barron’s article “The Hazards of the Industry – New Requirements for Reporting to OSHA” was featured in HR Professional Magazine on February 20, 2015.

It’s Time to Post the OSHA 300A Annual Summary of Illnesses and Injuries

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) Form 300A, which lists a summary of the total number of job-related injuries and illnesses that occurred during 2014 at each workplace, must be posted between February 1 and April 30, 2015. Place it in a conspicuous location where notices to employees are usually posted, and make sure that the posting is not altered, defaced, or covered by other material.

Reminder: February 1 Deadline for Posting of OSHA 300A Form

All employers who are required by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to maintain records of injuries and illnesses have until February 1, 2015, to get their records in order. Form 300A is a summary log of work? related injuries and illnesses from 2014 that must be posted where employees can see it between February 1 and April 30, 2015. The 300A includes summary information from the 300 Logs, including: total numbers of cases of job?related injuries and illnesses; total number of days away from work and number of days of job transfer or restriction; and the total numbers of injury and illness types. In addition, it includes the average number of employees and hours worked by all employees for the year. It is important to note that the Form 300A must be posted even if there were no recordable incidents in 2014.

New OSHA Reporting Requirements Now In Effect

As 2015 begins, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is sharpening its emphasis on inspecting and citing employers who violate its recordkeeping standard. This takes on greater importance because of the changes and new reporting requirements that became effective on January 1, 2015.

OSHA: Kinesiology Tape is “Medical Treatment” for Recordkeeping Purposes

You have probably seen kinesiology tape, also known as KT Tape or Kinesio Tape: those bright, neon-colored tape strips worn by runners, cyclists, athletes, triathletes, and folks at the gym.

OSHA's Expanded Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements

Happy New Year from OSHA! In 2015 employers must comply with two changes to OSHA reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

Auto Dealers Will Soon Have To Maintain OSHA 300 Recordkeeping

Come January 1, 2015, OSHA’s newly announced Recordkeeping changes will most harshly affect manufacturers but the largest group affected is auto dealers.

Important New OSHA Reporting Requirements and Proposed Rulemaking Regarding Injury and Illness Reporting

Final rule goes into effect on January 1, 2015.

Electronic Recordkeeping: OSHA Manages to Make a Bad Proposal Even Worse

In November 2013, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) proposed regulations requiring employers to submit injury and illness data electronically, rather than maintain paper OSHA Form 300 logs of work-related injuries and illnesses and Form 301 injury and illness incident reports. The proposal raised many concerns for employers. Perhaps most alarming was OSHA’s proposal to post each facility’s Form 300 logs and 301 forms online on the OSHA website. OSHA had reasoned that the conspicuous disclosure of such records would provide important information to the public and prospective employees. Others also observed that the impact of the proposed regulatory changes would provide substantial benefits to union organizers and plaintiffs’ attorneys.

OSHA Announces Final Rule On Recording Requirements

On September 11, 2014, OSHA released its final rule for Occupational Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting Requirements. The rule, which takes effect on January 1, 2015, makes two important changes that tighten OSHA’s presently relaxed reporting requirements.

OSHA Announces Final Rule Changing List of Establishments Required to Keep Records and Reporting of Work-Related Injuries

Executive Summary: On September 11, 2014, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced a final rule changing the list of establishments required to keep records and reporting of work-related injuries. The new rule goes into effect January 1, 2015.

OSHA Announces Significant Alterations to Reporting Requirements

On September 11, 2014, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced a final rule that significantly changes an employer’s duties to report workplace injuries to the agency.

OSHA Announces New Rule for Reporting Severe Injuries

On September 11, 2014, OSHA announced a new final rule requiring employers to notify OSHA when an employee is killed on the job or suffers a work-related hospitalization, amputation or loss of an eye. The rule, which also updates the list of employers partially exempt from OSHA record-keeping requirements, goes into effect on January 1, 2015.

Reminder: Post Your 2013 OSHA Recordkeeping Annual Summary By February 1, 2014

Going into 2014, OSHA is continuing its focus of inspecting and, when alleged violations found, citing employers under its recordkeeping standard. Proper recordkeeping has become more critical to employers since OSHA recently issued a proposed rule to publish, in certain cases, the injury and illness data provided by employers.

NEWSFLASH: OSHA Sets Public Hearing on Publishing Employer’s Recordkeeping Logs for January 9, 2014

On November 15, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced via the Federal Register that it would hold an informal public hearing on its controversial proposal to publish online employer’s injury and illness logs. The hearing is scheduled for Thursday, January 9, 2014, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. EST at the U.S. Department of Labor’s auditorium, 200 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20210.

OSHA Proposes Publishing Worker Injury Data

OSHA has announced a proposed rule which will require establishments with 20 or more employees in certain industries with high injury and illness rates, to electronically submit their summary of work-related injuries and illnesses to OSHA every year.

Regulation by Shaming: OSHA Proposes to Publish Employers’ Injury and Illness Records Online

In a proposed rule published in the Federal Register on November 8, 2013, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) presented a drastic change to employers’ recordkeeping and reporting obligations. Current regulations only require employers to notify OSHA of fatalities or incidents involving the hospitalization of three or more employees. Employers must also post their OSHA 300A summaries (which contain a summary of each establishment’s total number of incidents for the calendar year) in the workplace. But they are not required to send these summaries to OSHA or the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), unless requested.

2012 OSHA Recordkeeping Annual Summary Must Be Posted By February 1, 2013

In 2012, OSHA expanded its focus and increased the number of citations involving its recordkeeping standard.

D.C. Circuit Rejects OSHA's Recordkeeping Citation Policy

In a significant victory for employers, the D.C. Circuit has held that OSHA recordkeeping violations must be cited within six months of the failure to record, or the citations will be considered untimely. An employer's failure to properly record or maintain workplace injury and illness records for the requisite five-year period under OSHA's recordkeeping regulations does not constitute a continuing violation that tolls the six-month statute of limitations for issuing citations. This decision effectively limits OSHA's ability to issue citations for recordkeeping violations that fall outside the statutory six-month limitations period, as stated in the federal Occupational Safety and Health Act.

2011 OSHA Recordkeeping Annual Summary Must Be Posted By February 1, 2012

All employers maintaining the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's 300 Logs for workplace injuries and illnesses pursuant to OSHA's recordkeeping standard must post their 2011 annual summary by February 1, 2012. Employers must utilize the annual summary form (form 300A) when complying with the posting requirements. The form is available for downloading from the OSHA website.

2011 OSHA Recordkeeping Annual Summary Must Be Posted By February 1, 2012

All employers maintaining the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's 300 Logs for workplace injuries and illnesses pursuant to OSHA's recordkeeping standard must post their 2011 annual summary by February 1, 2012. Employers must utilize the annual summary form (form 300A) when complying with the posting requirements. The form is available for downloading from the OSHA website.

OSHA Plans to Revise Injury and Illness Reporting Requirements

On June 22, 2011, OSHA published a proposed rule revising the injury and illness reporting requirements for employers. Currently, employers must report to OSHA, within eight hours, all work-related fatalities and in-patient hospitalizations of three or more employees. Under OSHA’s expanded proposed rule, employers would be required to report to OSHA, within eight hours, all work-related amputations as well as fatalities, and all work-related in-patient hospitalizations regardless of how many employees go to the hospital.

DOL Help for Employer On OSHA Reporting

Last week I posted about DOL's new app for employees to keep records of their hours worked, so to be fair, the DOL does not limit its computerized assistance to employees. It also has on line assistance designed to help the employer community comply with their obligations under various statutes.

2010 OSHA Recordkeeping Annual Summary Must Be Posted By February 1, 2011

All employers maintaining the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's 300 Logs for workplace injuries and illnesses pursuant to OSHA's recordkeeping standard must post their 2010 annual summary by February 1, 2011. Employers must utilize the annual summary form (form 300A) when complying with the posting requirements. The form is available for downloading from the OSHA website.

OSHA's New Recordkeeping Program: Are You Ready?

Most employers are required to fill out OSHA 300 Logs, which are used to classify work-related illness and injuries. Once an incident occurs, the employer must enter into the log the details of the illness/injury of how and what happened. Employers must keep the log (and summary) for each establishment or site where they have employees. Within seven days of learning the information about the incident, the employer must record any such work-related illness/injuries resulting in:

OSHA Recordkeeping Summary Must Be Posted By February 1 And Is More Important Than Ever.

Most employers are required to maintain the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's 300 Logs for workplace injuries and illnesses and post their 2009 annual summary by February 1, 2010. Employers must utilize the annual summary form (form 300A) when complying with the posting requirements. The form is available for downloading from the OSHA website.

OSHA Announces National Emphasis Program On Injury and Illness Recordkeeping.

On October 1, 2009 the Occupational Safety and Health Administration released its plan for implementing its National Emphasis Program (NEP) to assess the accuracy of injury-and-illness data recorded by employers. The NEP was enacted in response to several studies, including one by the Government Accountability Office (GAO), that have claimed that there exists a serious problem of underreporting workplace injuries and illnesses on the OSHA Form 300. Specifically the NEP will focus on auditing employers' reports of workplace injuries and illnesses to identify instances of underreporting in high-hazard industries.
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