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ten most recent state employment law articles Ten Most Recent State Law Articles

How to Comply With California’s New Requirement to Provide Anti-Harassment Training on Gender Identity, Gender Expression, and Sexual Orientation

Ogletree Deakins • October 19, 2017
On October 15, 2017, Governor Brown signed Senate Bill 396, a new law that requires employers in California with 50 or more employees to provide training on policies that prohibit harassment based on gender identity, gender expression, and sexual orientation. This training is to be provided as a component of the already-required two-hour sexual harassment training provided to supervisory employees once every two years and within six months of an employee’s assumption of a supervisory position.

California Expands Harassment Training Requirements

Ogletree Deakins • October 19, 2017
On October 15, 2017, Governor Brown signed Senate Bill (SB) 396 into law. California employers with 50 or more employees currently must provide two hours of sexual harassment training for supervisors every two years. This legislation expands the subjects that the mandatory supervisor training must include.

Georgia Court of Appeals Confirms Non-Solicitation of Employees Covenant Need Not Have Geographic or Material Contact Language

Jackson Lewis P.C. • October 19, 2017
As previously noted in Jackson Lewis’ Non-Compete & Trade Secrets Report, Georgia adopted legislation governing restrictive covenant agreements entered into on or after May 11, 2011.

New York City Council Expands Earned Sick Time Law to Include Safe Time

Jackson Lewis P.C. • October 19, 2017
New York City’s Earned Sick Time Act (also known as the Paid Sick Leave Law) will require employers to allow employees to use paid time off for “Safe Time” under an amendment (Int. 1313-A) passed by the New York City Council on October 17, 2017. Under the revised law (the “Earned Safe and Sick Time Act”), employers will be required to provide paid time off for hours taken in connection with family offense matters, sexual offenses, stalking, and human trafficking.

NYC Commission on Human Rights Releases FAQs on Salary History Law in Advance of October 31 Effective Date

Ogletree Deakins • October 19, 2017
As we previously reported in April of 2017 and May of 2017, New York City employers may want to prepare for the New York City salary history law, which will go into effect on October 31, 2017.

Puerto Rico Secretary of Labor Issues Opinion Regarding Employee Compensation Following Hurricanes Irma and María

Littler Mendelson, P.C. • October 19, 2017
On October 17, 2017, the Puerto Rico Secretary of Labor and Human Resources (Secretary) issued Opinion No. 2017-001 (Opinion) regarding the compensation of exempt and non-exempt private sector employees for workdays interrupted by Hurricanes Irma and María and their aftermath.

Employers Helping Employees—Are Disaster Relief Payments and Loans Exempt From Puerto Rico Income Tax?

Ogletree Deakins • October 19, 2017
With the havoc wrought by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico, employers are exploring options to provide emergency relief to those employees who have encountered financial hardship to meet their necessities and repair their homes in the wake of the disaster. Occasionally, aid from employers to employees comes in the form of disaster-relief monetary payments and interest-free loans. In light of the state of emergency in Puerto Rico declared by local authorities, on October 4, 2017, the Puerto Rico Department of Treasury released Administrative Determination No. 17-21 (AD 17-21), which provides necessary and well-timed guidance on the taxation of this type of assistance.

California Governor Signs Ban the Box Law to Go Into Effect in the New Year

Ogletree Deakins • October 19, 2017
On October 14, 2017, the governor of California signed a statewide ban-the-box law that goes into effect on January 1, 2018. For California individuals, the law places statewide limitations on most pre-conditional offer inquiries into an applicant’s criminal history; prohibits the consideration of certain criminal history information, at all times; and creates a robust pre-adverse and adverse action process.

Construction One-Minute Read: California Officials Put Additional Pressure on General Contractors to Prevent Wage Theft

Ogletree Deakins • October 19, 2017
General contractors’ top priorities on a construction project are completing the work on time, completing the work within budget, and guarding against future construction defect claims. New and pending laws in California, however, have added one more item to that list: serving as guarantor for the wages and fringe benefits owed not only to their employees but to each of its subcontractor’s employees as well.

California Bans Salary History Questions, Restricts Criminal History Inquiries

XpertHR • October 19, 2017
California Governor Jerry Brown has signed into law two measures that restrict employers from asking job applicants about salary and criminal history. Both laws are effective January 1, 2018.

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