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ten most recent federal employment law articles Ten Most Recent Federal Articles

"White Collar" Exemption Changes: Keep Calm And Carry On

Fisher Phillips • July 26, 2016
Recent Congressional initiatives have targeted the impending increases in the U.S. Labor Department's dollar-amount thresholds for most of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act's so-called "white collar" exemptions.

Employee Handbooks: Managing State and Municipal Employment Laws

XpertHR • July 26, 2016
Running a business and managing employees can be extremely challenging – especially when an employer and HR need to comply with federal, state and municipal requirements.

FAQs on the Final Overtime Regulations

Ogletree Deakins • July 25, 2016
On May 18, the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) Wage and Hour Division released the new final overtime rule. The new minimum salary level for the executive, administrative, and professional employee exemptions under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) will be $913 per week, or $47,476 per year, under final regulations. This new salary threshold—which will become effective on December 1, 2016—more than doubles the current minimum salary level of $455 per week, or $23,660 per year and will have a dramatic impact on employers. Below are answers to some frequently asked questions about the new rule.

Employee Password Sharing Can Be Criminal Activity, 9th Circuit Finds

XpertHR • July 25, 2016
A divided 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has upheld the criminal conviction of a man who accessed his former employer's database to gain proprietary information by using a former co-worker's username and password. The case of US v. Nosal involved a former high-level executive at Korn/Ferry International, an executive search firm.

Evolving Hiring Methods in the Gig Economy

Fisher Phillips • July 25, 2016
The Gig economy is revolutionizing the employment arena and, as noted in our recent blog post, it shows no sign of slowing down or waiting for others to catch up. One change that is front and center is the evolution of traditional hiring methods. Many gig employers are transitioning away from the traditional paper applications and short in-person interviews where a candidate is asked standard questions such as “what do you bring to the table;“ or “where do you think you’ll be in five years;” or, my personal favorite, “what’s your biggest flaw?”

Employers Can Claim Tip Credit Even When Employees Perform 'Related Duties,' 7th Circuit Rules

XpertHR • July 25, 2016
Restaurants and other employers that require wait staff, bartenders and other tipped employees to clean tables, make coffee or perform other similar duties can draw comfort from a new appeals court ruling.

Labor Unions Use Technology to Grow and Maintain Membership

Jackson Lewis P.C. • July 25, 2016
Labor unions today are “tech” savvy, using mobile app and other technology to grow and maintain their memberships.

Adventures in Buttonland: NLRB Rejects Employer Attempts to Ban Buttons at Work

Franczek Radelet P.C • July 24, 2016
Two recent cases, one from the National Labor Relations Board, and one from a federal court of appeals enforcing an NLRB decision, highlight the risk an employer runs when it seeks to prohibit its employees from wearing buttons at work.

Is proposed legislation likely to slow the implementation of the new overtime regulations? Probably not.

Ogletree Deakins • July 24, 2016
On May 18, 2016, the Department of Labor (DOL) announced the publication of a final rule, updating its existing overtime regulations. The updated regulations are scheduled to become effective on December 1 of this year and are predicted to extend overtime pay protections to over 4 million workers within the first year of implementation. The updates include a provision under which employees are eligible for overtime compensation if they work over 40 hours in a week and earn less than $47,476 per year – an over 100% increase from the current salary threshold of $23,660.

Share FAQs on the Final Overtime Regulations

Ogletree Deakins • July 24, 2016
On May 18, the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) Wage and Hour Division released the new final overtime rule. The new minimum salary level for the executive, administrative, and professional employee exemptions under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) will be $913 per week, or $47,476 per year, under final regulations. This new salary threshold—which will become effective on December 1, 2016—more than doubles the current minimum salary level of $455 per week, or $23,660 per year and will have a dramatic impact on employers. Below are answers to some frequently asked questions about the new rule.