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Green v. Brennan.

Articles Discussing Case:

Supreme Court Clarifies the Time Period for Initiating Constructive Discharge Claims

Littler Mendelson, P.C. • May 31, 2016
On May 23, 2016, the United States Supreme Court issued its decision in Green v. Brennan, holding that the statute of limitations for a constructive discharge claim begins to run at the time the employee resigns. While the Court’s 7-1 decision was unsurprising and does not change the substantive law of constructive discharge, it provides employers and employees alike with the benefit of a clear rule for assessing the timeliness of charges alleging constructive discharge.

Resignation Date Starts the Statute of Limitations Clock In Constructive Discharge Cases, Supreme Court Holds

Franczek Radelet P.C • May 31, 2016
On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the statute of limitations for purposes of filing a claim alleging constructive discharge begins to run on the date that the employee resigns, as opposed to the last discriminatory act that prompts the resignation, resolving a circuit split.

SCOTUS Rules Resignation Triggers Statute of Limitations in Constructive Discharge Cases

Goldberg Segalla LLP • May 25, 2016
Federal and private-sector employers alike should take note of yesterday’s decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in Green v. Brennan. The issue in Green was whether a federal employee’s claim of discrimination in a constructive discharge case was triggered by the last act of alleged discrimination by the employer or by the date on which the employee resigned. The Supreme Court reversed the Tenth Circuit decision and held that the statute of limitations in a constructive discharge case begins to run on the date the employee resigns because that is the date when the employee has a “complete and present cause of action.”

Supreme Court: Constructive Discharge Limitations Period Begins with Notice of Resignation

Jackson Lewis P.C. • May 25, 2016
The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that the statute of limitations for an employee’s Title VII constructive discharge claim begins on the date of the employee’s notice of resignation. Green v. Brennan, No. 14-613 (May 23, 2016).

SCOTUS Rules Notice of Resignation Starts the Clock in a Federal Employee’s Constructive Discharge Case

Ogletree Deakins • May 24, 2016
On May 23, 2016, the Supreme Court of the United States decided when the limitations period for filing a lawsuit begins to run for a federal employee claiming he or she resigned—or was “constructively discharged”—due to discrimination in violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. According to the Court, a federal civil servant must “initiate contact” with an Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) counselor at his or her agency “within 45 days of the date of the matter alleged to be discriminatory” before he or she may file suit under Title VII. In a constructive discharge case, the Court further held, the “matter alleged to be discriminatory” includes the employee’s resignation. Thus, “the 45-day clock for a constructive discharge begins running only after the employee resigns.” Green v. Brennan, No. 14–613, Supreme Court of the United States (May 23, 2016).

Supreme Court Rules that Statute of Limitations Period for Constructive Discharge Claims Begins to Run from Date of Notice of Resignation

FordHarrison LLP • May 24, 2016
Executive Summary: The U.S. Supreme Court recently held that the statute of limitations period for constructive discharge claims under Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act (Title VII) begins to run from the date that the employee gives the employer notice that the employee is resigning. Reversing the Tenth Circuit's decision in favor of the employer, in Green v. Brennan, the Supreme Court held that "the matter alleged to be discriminatory includes the employee's resignation," and that the limitation period for filing a claim for a constructive discharge begins running only after the employee resigns.

SCOTUS Gives Boost To Employee Constructive Discharge Claims

Fisher Phillips • May 23, 2016
In a 7 to 1 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court found today that the statute of limitations for a constructive discharge claim under Title VII begins on the date of the employee’s notice of resignation, not on the date of the last alleged discriminatory act by the employer. This is a bad decision for employers and will likely lead to an uptick in legal claims filed by disgruntled former workers. It opens the door for former employees to file constructive discharge claims long after the alleged discriminatory conduct occurred by simply delaying their resignation indefinitely. Green v. Brennan.

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