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Jacobs v. N.C. Administrative Office of the Courts, 4th Circ., No. 13-2212

Articles Discussing Case:

EEOC has defined "ability to interact with others" as a major life activity, making social anxiety disorder a disability under the ADA

Ogletree Deakins • April 21, 2015
An employee who was fired after asking to be reassigned to a role with less direct personal interaction as an accommodation for her social anxiety disorder has been allowed by the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals to take her case to a jury. Jacobs v. N.C. Administrative Office of the Courts, No. 13-2212 (March 12, 2015).

Anxiety Over the ADA

Goldberg Segalla LLP • March 31, 2015
The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is designed to protect people with disabilities from discrimination in the workplace. Under the ADA, an employer must provide a reasonable accommodation to an employee with a disability if the employee requests an accommodation. Employers should take note of a recent decision that includes a new class within the definition of disability. In Jacobs v. N.C. Administrative Office of the Courts, the court reversed the district court and found that social anxiety disorder is a protected disability under the ADA.