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Integrity Staffing Solutions, Inc. v. Busk

Articles Discussing Case:

Whose Time Is It Anyway? Key Decisions Clarify the Meaning of Compensable Time

Vedder Price • March 18, 2015
Late last year, the U.S. Supreme Court issued an opinion in Integrity Staffing Solutions v. Busk, providing some clarity regarding whether employees must be compensated for certain "mandatory" activities engaged in before they start and after they finish their workday. The plaintiffs, contract workers assigned to an Amazon.com, Inc. fulfillment facility, accused their employer, Integrity Staffing Solutions, of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) by failing to compensate them for the time they were required to spend each day going through a theft-prevention security checkpoint before leaving the warehouse. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, when presented with the issue, held that the security screenings were compensable employment activities, reasoning that "the screenings were 'necessary' to the employees' primary work as warehouse employees and done for Integrity Staffing's benefit."

To pay or not to pay? Court holds employer is not obligated to pay for attendance at mandatory treatment program

Nexsen Pruet • February 24, 2015
Although most employers are aware that an employee’s time spent working is generally compensable, the question of what actually constitutes compensable “working time” under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) is an area fraught with uncertainty and the subject of substantial litigation. Indeed, in December 2014, in the case of Integrity Staffing Solutions, Inc. v. Busk, the U.S. Supreme Court concluded that employees’ time spent waiting to undergo and undergoing security screenings was not compensable working time. If the amount of litigation surrounding this issue is any indication, determining whether employee activity connected to employment is compensable is an area where mistakes are easily and commonly made by employers.

Workers Not Entitled to Pay for Security Check Time

Goldberg Segalla LLP • December 11, 2014
Employers should be relieved to know that they are not required to pay employees for security check time. In a unanimous opinion issued Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court held that workers are not entitled to be paid for time spent waiting for and undergoing post-shift anti-theft screenings under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) as amended by the Portal to Portal Act.

Supreme Court Narrows Test for Compensable Time Under the FLSA

FordHarrison LLP • December 10, 2014
Executive Summary: On December 9, 2014, the United States Supreme Court issued a unanimous decision favorable to employers significantly limiting the types of preliminary and postliminary activities that are compensable under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). In Integrity Staffing Solutions, Inc. v. Busk, the Court held that the time spent by warehouse workers waiting to undergo and undergoing security screenings before leaving for the day is not compensable.

eLABORate: Supreme Court Holds Security Screening Time Non-Compensable Under the FLSA

Phelps Dunbar LLP • December 10, 2014
On December 9, 2014, in a 9-0 decision, the United States Supreme Court held that employees’ time spent waiting to undergo and undergoing security screenings is not compensable time under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”). Integrity Staffing Solutions, Inc. v. Busk, No. 13-433, 2014 WL 6885951 (2014).

No Pay For Security Checks: Supreme Court

Fisher Phillips • December 10, 2014
Today, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously held that employees are not entitled to compensation for time spent waiting for and participating in mandatory security screenings at the end of their shifts. The decision reached by the Supreme Court is a victory for the increasing number of employers nationwide who screen employees to prevent theft. In addition, the Court provided much-needed guidance in an area of wage and hour law that has historically been the subject of litigation: when does the compensable workday begin and end? Integrity Staffing v. Busk.

Pre-Departure Security Screening Not FLSA Worktime

Fisher Phillips • December 10, 2014
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled today that the time non-exempt employees spent in connection with an end-of-workday security screening before leaving the premises did not count as worktime under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act. Instead, it said, the time so spent was non-compensable "postliminary" activity under the federal Portal-to-Portal Act.

Unanimous Supreme Court Rules Employer Need Not Pay for Worker Security Screenings: Integrity Staffing Solutions, Inc. v. Busk

Franczek Radelet P.C • December 10, 2014
In October, we profiled Integrity Staffing Solutions, Inc. v. Busk, a case asking whether time spent in security screenings is compensable under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Warehouse workers sued Integrity Staffing under the FLSA for uncompensated time they were required to spend in lengthy security screenings (lasting up to 25 minutes) at the end of their shifts during their assignments to work in Amazon warehouses. At the time, we suggested that it would be “hard to envision a result different” from last term’s Sandifer v. U.S. Steel case. This prediction came true, but from a unanimous Supreme Court, rather than a sharply divided one. The Court held that the employees at Integrity Staffing Solutions facilities in Nevada could not claim compensation for the time spent going through security screenings aimed at protecting against theft because these activities were not integral and indispensable to their principal duties.